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Scape   /skeɪp/   Listen
Scape

noun
1.
Erect leafless flower stalk growing directly from the ground as in a tulip.  Synonym: flower stalk.
2.
(architecture) upright consisting of the vertical part of a column.  Synonym: shaft.






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"Scape" Quotes from Famous Books



... of LIES, A gallant people's glowing sympathies:— You cannot hide your idol God from them, When prone you kiss its garment's nether hem:— You cannot waste their treasure on a cause, That boldly violates their guardian laws; And 'scape the arrows from their quiver hurl'd— The keen reproach, and hisses of the world. You may cry 'GUILTY!' but the umpire land Cancels the verdict with indignant hand, Reveres the NOBLE MANY who uphold ...
— The Ghost of Chatham; A Vision - Dedicated to the House of Peers • Anonymous

... shall poverty reside, To 'scape the pressure of contiguous pride? If to some common's fenceless limits strayed, He drives his flock to pick the scanty blade, Those fenceless fields the sons of wealth divide, And even ...
— English Poets of the Eighteenth Century • Selected and Edited with an Introduction by Ernest Bernbaum

... three or four times, or blow your nose till it smart again, to recover your memory. When you come to be a president in criminal causes, if you smile upon a prisoner, hang him; but if you frown upon him and threaten him, let him be sure to scape the gallows. ...
— The Duchess of Malfi • John Webster

... Sin's long labyrinth had run, Nor made atonement when he did amiss, Had sighed to many, though he loved but one, And that loved one, alas, could ne'er be his. Ah, happy she! to 'scape from him whose kiss Had been pollution unto aught so chaste; Who soon had left her charms for vulgar bliss, And spoiled her goodly lands to gild his waste, Nor calm domestic peace ...
— Childe Harold's Pilgrimage • Lord Byron

... age between himself and others. The great rotary presses in the basement of the Record building had filled him with a new enthusiasm: he had painted there, and Sir James had bought at sight, what he called a machinery-scape in the ...
— The Woman in Black • Edmund Clerihew Bentley

... full of love and tender sympathy with the author of this exquisite poem, let us now look among the botanists for a description of the Daisy. We will find: 'Perenuius (Daisy, E.W. & P. 21), leaves obovate, crenate; scape naked, 1 flowered; or, Leucanthemum (Ox-eyed Daisy), leaves clasping, lanceolate, serrate, cut-toothed at the base; stem erect, branching.' (See ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 5, November, 1863 • Various

... a splendid party;[397] amongst others, Marshal Marmont—middle size, stout-made, dark complexion, and looks sensible. The French hate him much for his conduct in 1814, but it is only making him the scape-goat. Also, I saw Mons. de Mole, but especially the Marquis de Lauriston, who received me most kindly. He is personally like my cousin Colonel Russell. I learned that his brother, Louis Law,[398] my old friend, was alive, and the father of a large family. I was ...
— The Journal of Sir Walter Scott - From the Original Manuscript at Abbotsford • Walter Scott

... Ruffins then surround the cabin & set it a fire. The Browns giv theirselves up for gone coons, when the hired gal diskivers a trap door to the cabin & thay go down threw it & cum up threw the bulkhed. Their merraklis 'scape reminds me of the 'scape of De Jones, the Coarsehair of the Gulf—a tail with a yaller kiver, that I onct red. For sixteen years he was confined in a loathsum dunjin, not tastin food durin all that time. When a lucky thawt struck him! He opend the winder and got out. To resoom—Old Brown ...
— The Complete Works of Artemus Ward, Part 1 • Charles Farrar Browne

... Davison, gentleman-in-ordinary of her Majesty's household, arrived at the Hague; a man painstaking, earnest, and zealous, but who was fated, on more than one great occasion, to be made a scape-goat for the delinquencies of ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... ne'er From Hel return to upper air! Betrayed by Loki, twice betrayed, The prisoner of Death is made; Ne'er shall he 'scape the place of doom Till ...
— Myths of the Norsemen - From the Eddas and Sagas • H. A. Guerber

... exception of Capell, are unanimous in rejecting Titus Andronicus as unworthy of Shakspeare, though they always allow it to be printed with the other pieces, as the scape-goat, as it were, of their abusive criticism. The correct method in such an investigation is first to examine into the external grounds, evidences, &c., and to weigh their value; and then to adduce the internal reasons derived ...
— Lectures on Dramatic Art - and Literature • August Wilhelm Schlegel trans John Black

... folly and so much knavery I am become the victim of both; that I was distressed by the former, when the latter would have been less grievous to me, since it is much better in business to be yoked to knaves than fools; and that I put into their hands the means of loading me, like the scape-goat, with all the evil ...
— Letters to Sir William Windham and Mr. Pope • Lord Bolingbroke

... old renown— Osiris, Isis, Orus, and their train— With monstrous shapes and sorceries abused Fanatic Egypt and her priests to seek Their wandering gods disguised in brutish forms Rather than human. Nor did Israel scape Th' infection, when their borrowed gold composed The calf in Oreb; and the rebel king Doubled that sin in Bethel and in Dan, Likening his Maker to the grazed ox— Jehovah, who, in one night, when he passed From Egypt marching, equalled with one ...
— Paradise Lost • John Milton

... has said it, and will act on it. And Thuriot, who prints for the University! Would you 'scape them? You would? Then listen to me. I want but two things. First, how many men has Montsoreau's fellow in the Castle? Few, I know, for he is a niggard, and if he spends, he ...
— Count Hannibal - A Romance of the Court of France • Stanley J. Weyman

... have it so; For they teach well who teach their scholars' tongue! But that the foolish both should gaze, With feeble, fascinated face, Upon the wan crest of the coming woe, The billow of earthquake underneath the seas, And sit at ease, Or stand agape, Without so much as stepping back to 'scape, Mumbling, 'Perchance we perish if we stay: 'Tis certain wear of shoes to stir away!' Who could have dreamt That times should come like these! Remnant of Honour, tongue-tied with contempt, Consider; you are strong yet, if you ...
— The Unknown Eros • Coventry Patmore

... who are fond of going against the general opinion, who did not hesitate to declare this was all gammon. They knew Jessup too well to 'allow' he cared any thing about it, not he. Nothing but the fear of that honest young Meeker led to the disgrace of Pease, who no doubt would now be made the scape-grace for all Jessup's shortcomings in the store-way. So it went. But in the balance of accounts Jessup was a great gainer. Of course, numerous were the questions put to Hiram. He preserved great discretion—would say little. It did not become him to speak of Mr. Jessup's ...
— Continental Monthly, Vol. II. July, 1862. No. 1. • Various

... laugh not, Felix! He thy Judge will be, No refuge there for impious blasphemy! Nor kings nor clowns can 'scape His righteous ire, His slaughtered Saints of ...
— Polyuecte • Pierre Corneille

... than a wheel; Hiss'd from the stage, or hooted from the court, Their air, their dress, their politicks, import; [p]Obsequious, artful, voluble and gay, On Britain's fond credulity they prey. No gainful trade their industry can 'scape, [q]They sing, they dance, clean shoes, or cure a clap: All sciences a fasting Monsieur knows, And, bid him go to hell, to hell he goes. [r]Ah! what avails it, that, from slav'ry far, I drew the breath of life in English air; Was early taught a Briton's right ...
— Dr. Johnson's Works: Life, Poems, and Tales, Volume 1 - The Works Of Samuel Johnson, Ll.D., In Nine Volumes • Samuel Johnson

... good one. "English, you know, quite English." Lots of good landscapes by LEADER, bright, fresh, breezy. Young painters should "follow their Leader," and they can't go very far wrong. I would write a leader on the subject, and introduce something about the land-scape-goat, only I know it would be cut out. Being very busy, sent Young Par to see Miss CHARLOTTE ROBINSON's Exhibition of Screens. He behaved badly. Instead of looking at matters in a serious light, he seemed to look upon ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 99., Nov. 22, 1890 • Various

... slew the carlish count, That throld both laid and tall; And then as they strove to 'scape through the door, She slew the ...
— Tord of Hafsborough - and Other Ballads • Anonymous

... lake-scape is blue and green and grey and opaline as the sun strikes it and the surface breaks to a south wind. Ours is the one craft on this inland sea, but overhead a whole navy of clouds manoeuvres, the ships ...
— The New North • Agnes Deans Cameron

... thence, I scape thro' foes and fire: Before the goddess, foes and flames retire. Arriv'd at home, he, for whose only sake, Or most for his, such toils I undertake, The good Anchises, whom, by timely flight, I purpos'd to secure on Ida's height, Refus'd the journey, resolute to die ...
— The Aeneid • Virgil

... wise, Bade the rude trifle into light arise, Little she thought such tempests would ensue; Less, that those tempests would be raised by you. The thunder's fury rends the towering oak, Rosciads, like shrubs, might 'scape the fatal stroke. Vain thought! a critic's fury knows no bound; Drawcansir-like, he deals destruction round; Nor can we hope he will a stranger spare, Who gives no quarter to his friend Voltaire.[85] 70 Unhappy Genius! placed by partial Fate With a ...
— Poetical Works • Charles Churchill

... to heave and rock and sway to and fro and make the strangest of movements steed ever made, till its belly was filled with air and it took flight with its rider and soared high into the sky. When the King saw this, he cried out to his men, saying, "Woe to you! catch him, catch him, ere he 'scape you!" But his Wazirs and Viceroys said to him, "O King, can a man overtake the flying bird? This is surely none but some mighty magician or Marid of the Jinn or devil, and Allah save thee from him. So praise ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... oblivion's curtain over Kings, Their sumptuous monuments, men know them not, Their names without a Record are forgot, Their parts, their ports, their pomp's all laid in th' dust, Nor wit nor gold, nor buildings scape time's rust; But he whose name is grav'd in the white stone Shall last and shine when ...
— Anne Bradstreet and Her Time • Helen Campbell

... observation tells me, that those persons who are most inclined to see defects in family government, and to find fault with other people's management of their children, are apt to have the most unruly young scape-graces in their ...
— Home Scenes, and Home Influence - A Series of Tales and Sketches • T. S. Arthur

... spirit-lamp and sterilised my lancet by heating it in the flame. Now, having provided myself with an ivory point and unsealed the tiny tube of lymph, I sat down in a chair so that the light from the electric lamp fell full upon my arm, and proceeded to scape the skin with the lancet until blood appeared in four or five separate places. Next I took the ivory point, and, after cleansing it, I charged it with the lymph and applied it to the abrasions, being careful to give each of them a liberal dose. The operation finished, I sat still ...
— Doctor Therne • H. Rider Haggard

... beautiful sketch of Murten and the battle-field! How quietly the land-scape sleeps there by the lake, after the battle! Did you ever read the ballad of Veit Weber, the shoe-maker, on this subject? He says, the routed Burgundians jumped into the lake, and the Swiss Leaguers shot them down like wild ducks ...
— Hyperion • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

... shall the hapless archer do who when he fronts his foe * And bends his bow to shoot the shaft shall find his string undight? When cark and care so heavy bear on youth[FN112] of generous soul * How shall he 'scape his lot and where from Fate his ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... selves, until we ourselves appeal to the unknown, in a sort of despairing ecstasy of unsatisfied delight, asking of possibility to stretch itself out to the impossible. We are in a strange phase of development. We see the elaborately artificial world-scape painted by Science on the curtain close before our eyes, but our restless hands are thrust through it and beyond, opening eagerly and shutting on nothing, though we know that ...
— Casa Braccio, Volumes 1 and 2 (of 2) • F. Marion Crawford

... see no fun in bein' a rusticator anyway, down there by the sea-wall on a hot day, settin' up agin' a spruce tree admirin' the lan'scape, with ants an' pitch ekally ...
— Vesty of the Basins • Sarah P. McLean Greene

... Xauxa, a misfortune befell the Spaniards in the death of their creature, the young Inca Toparca. Suspicion, of course, fell on Challcuchima, now selected as the scape-goat for all the offences of his nation.18 It was a disappointment to Pizarro, who hoped to find a convenient shelter for his future proceedings under this ...
— History Of The Conquest Of Peru • William Hickling Prescott

... train cold Foresight move, Shunning the rose to 'scape the thorn; And Prudence every fear approve, And Pity ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel , Volume I. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... head We turn'd to flight; the gathering vengeance spread On all parts round, and heaps on heaps lay dead. Some few the foe in servitude detain; Death ill exchanged for bondage and for pain! Unhappy me a Cyprian took aboard, And gave to Dmetor, Cyprus' haughty lord: Hither, to 'scape his chains, my course I steer, Still cursed ...
— The Odyssey of Homer • Homer, translated by Alexander Pope

... struggle which would have dealt Greece the finishing stroke, forbade opposition and immediately abdicated, "happy," as he said, "that another opportunity has been given me to sacrifice myself once more for Greece." In fact, once more Constantine was made the scape-goat for disasters for which he was in no way responsible—disasters from which he would undoubtedly have saved his country, had he been allowed to pursue his own ...
— Greece and the Allies 1914-1922 • G. F. Abbott

... her, Mrs. Dollond. Wait till you see her—she's coming, you know. What do you think of that river-scape, most reverend signor? It's one of the little things I've been doing down at Rainham's ...
— A Comedy of Masks - A Novel • Ernest Dowson and Arthur Moore

... to 'scape these nuptials! Do it! Some opening for avoidance or escape,— Or to thy charge I'll lay a broken heart! It may be, broken vows, and blasted honour, ...
— The Hunchback • James Sheridan Knowles

... was radiant as the sun, The Ape was a most unsightly one - So it would not do - His scheme fell through; For the Maid, when his love took formal shape, Expressed such terror At his monstrous error, That he stammered an apology and made his 'scape, The picture ...
— Songs of a Savoyard • W. S. Gilbert

... angry with me, rebukes, commands, and dastards me. I have no conscience of marble, to resist the hammer of more heavy offences: nor yet so soft and waxen, as to take the impression of each single peccadillo or scape of infirmity. I am of a strange belief, that it is as easy to be forgiven some sins as to commit some others. For my original sin, I hold it to be washed away in my baptism; for my actual transgressions, I compute and reckon with God but from my last repentance, ...
— Religio Medici, Hydriotaphia, and the Letter to a Friend • Sir Thomas Browne

... departed; my brother talked much about the painter. "He is a noble fellow," said my brother; "but, like many other noble fellows, has a great many enemies; he is hated by his brethren of the brush—all the land and water-scape painters hate him—but, above all, the race of portrait painters, who are ten times more numerous than the other two sorts, detest him for his heroic tendencies. It will be a kind of triumph to the ...
— Lavengro - The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest • George Borrow

... never hurt me, nor the tardy gout: But in my time, I should be once surprised By a strong tedious talker, that should vex And almost bring me to consumption: Therefore, if I were wise, she warn'd me shun All such long-winded monsters as my bane; For if I could but 'scape that one discourser, I might no doubt prove an old aged man.— By your leave, ...
— The Poetaster - Or, His Arraignment • Ben Jonson

... immortall store, Where vertue, honour, wit, and beautie lay, Which taking thence, you haue escap'd away, Yet stand as free as ere you did before. But old Promethius punish'd for his rape, Thus poore theeues suffer, when the greater scape. ...
— Minor Poems of Michael Drayton • Michael Drayton

... summer sunshine chase Park shadows on the distant hills, And scented tufts of pansies grace Moist grots that 'scape rude ...
— Reviews • Oscar Wilde

... encountered the appraising glint in the coot grey eyes of the foppish scape-grace before her. She lowered her own eys quickly to hid a hunted look in their dark depths ...
— Down the Mother Lode • Vivia Hemphill

... were thus engaged, the hunter's ear was attentive to sounds that he had been hearing for more than an hour. These were the puff of 'scape-pipes and plash of a paddle-wheel, evidently from a small steamer in the Company Canal. She was coming down it; that is, from the direction of the river ...
— Bonaventure - A Prose Pastoral of Acadian Louisiana • George Washington Cable

... powers of hell Persuade me to despair; Lord, make me know thy covenant well, That I may 'scape the snare. ...
— The Psalms of David - Imitated in the Language of The New Testament - And Applied to The Christian State and Worship • Isaac Watts

... ships, how they were fyred fast, And how their men drowned themselves in the sea; There you might hear them cry, wayle and weep piteously, When they saw no shift to 'scape thence away. ...
— English Songs and Ballads • Various

... will be found in Leviticus 16: 21-22-23; but whether its application can be found is uncertain. Horticulturists are prone to find scape-goats to carry their sins of omission and commission; and they load these—a great burden—upon them, and send them off to be lost in the wilderness. Providence is most usually chosen by them for this purpose. Most of their ...
— Prairie Farmer, Vol. 56: No. 1, January 5, 1884. - A Weekly Journal for the Farm, Orchard and Fireside • Various

... begin to work then; No doubt, to flatter ye they have sent ye something, Of a rich value, Jewels, or some rich Treasure; May be a Rogue within to do a mischief; I pray you stand farther off, if there be villany, Better my danger first; he shall 'scape hard ...
— The False One • Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

... Destiny.—The scape-goat which we make responsible for all our crimes and follies; a necessity which we set down for invincible, when we have no wish to ...
— Pearls of Thought • Maturin M. Ballou

... synchronized to give identical indications. Thus a message is spelled out letter by letter on both dials simultaneously. The motions of the index are generally produced by what is virtually a recoil escapement. The scape wheel is carried by the axle of the index, and a pallet or anchor is vibrated by an electro-magnet whose armature is attached to the stem of the pallet. As the pallet is vibrated it turns the wheel and index one tooth for each single ...
— The Standard Electrical Dictionary - A Popular Dictionary of Words and Terms Used in the Practice - of Electrical Engineering • T. O'Conor Slone

... sanctuary of sky, Range we our fleet in triple serried lines To bar the passage from the seething strait, This way and that: let other ships surround The isle of Ajax, with this warning word— That if the Greeks their jeopardy should scape By wary craft, and win their ships a road. Each Persian captain shall his failure pay By forfeit of his head. So spake the king, Inspired at heart with over-confidence, Unwitting of the gods' predestined will. Thereon our crews, with no disordered haste, Did service to his bidding ...
— Suppliant Maidens and Other Plays • AEschylus

... you for all your efforts. Pleyel is a scoundrel, Probst a scape-grace. He never gave me 1,000 francs for three manuscripts. Very likely you have received my long letter about Schlesinger, therefore I wish you and beg of you to give that letter of mine to Pleyel, who thinks my manuscripts too dear. If I have to sell them cheap, ...
— Frederick Chopin as a Man and Musician - Volume 1-2, Complete • Frederick Niecks

... was not all. It seemed as if Yerbury meant to make them the scape-goat of every thing. Robert Winston was broadly caricatured; and there was a bit of insulting abuse, calling them traders in their brethren's blood, pasted up on the gate-post. "The Evening Transcript" went over the system of co-operation, and showed to its own satisfaction, that it was ...
— Hope Mills - or Between Friend and Sweetheart • Amanda M. Douglas

... thus to cleanse Her soul, and with such sacrifice to appease The Awful Ones, the Erinnyes, who in wrath For her slain sister straightway haunted her Unseen: for ever round the sinner's steps They hover; none may 'scape those Goddesses. And with her followed twelve beside, each one A princess, hot for war and battle grim, Far-famous each, yet handmaids unto her: Penthesileia far outshone them all. As when in the broad sky amidst the stars The moon rides over all pre-eminent, ...
— The Fall of Troy • Smyrnaeus Quintus

... his heel." Under the patriarchal economy there was a significant allusion to them in the offering up of Isaac. The Mosaic types were prophecies. The paschal lamb; the smitten rock; the brazen serpent; and the scape-goat on the day of expiation, exhibited this feature of Messiah's character. Well nigh every page of the prophets is marked by blood and sorrow. The Psalmist, in thrilling tone, enquires, "My God, my God why hast thou forsaken Me?" And in the last struggles ...
— The Wesleyan Methodist Pulpit in Malvern • Knowles King

... Away they fly to 'scape the rout, Their steeds they soundly switch; Some are thrown in, and some thrown out, And some thrown in the ditch. Yet a hunting we ...
— Old Ballads • Various

... happen Both to the Shrub and Tree, has told some How to make the deadliest Wholesome; These venomous Vulvaria grow At Vaux-Hall and St. James's too; Nay, and about the Tree so leap, That very few good Plants can 'scape. ...
— The Ladies Delight • Anonymous

... his soul, and God accepted it as such. From the very nature of the offering, this act of presentation contained an acknowledgment of guilt that needed expiation, but there was no formal transfer of his sins to the victim, as in the case of the scape-goat. ...
— Companion to the Bible • E. P. Barrows

... Staunch to the wave, from spear-storm free, Have to this shore escorted me, Nor so far blame I destiny. But may the all-seeing Father send In fitting time propitious end; So our dread Mother's mighty brood, The lordly couch may 'scape, ah me, ...
— Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 1 • Charles Dudley Warner

... every Faculty and Part, to all the kinds of Human, and, I had almost said Heavenly Capacity too. What shall we add more? Our Gardens present us with them all; and whilst the Shambles are cover'd with Gore and Stench, our Sallets scape the Insults of the Summer Fly, purifies and warms the Blood against Winter Rage: Nor wants there Variety in more abundance, than any of the former Ages ...
— Acetaria: A Discourse of Sallets • John Evelyn

... Hideous Bulk of Honour scape, Nadab that sets the gazing Crowd agape: That old Kirk-founder, whose course Croak could sing The Saints, the Cause, no Bishop, and no King: When Greatness clear'd his Throat, and scowr'd his Maw, Roard ...
— Anti-Achitophel (1682) - Three Verse Replies to Absalom and Achitophel by John Dryden • Elkanah Settle et al.

... Where virtue, honour, wit, and beauty lay; Which taking thence, you have escaped away, Yet stand as free as e'er you did before. Yet old Prometheus punished for his rape; Thus poor thieves suffer when the greater 'scape. ...
— Elizabethan Sonnet Cycles - Idea, by Michael Drayton; Fidessa, by Bartholomew Griffin; Chloris, by William Smith • Michael Drayton, Bartholomew Griffin, and William Smith

... kept at the public expense for some time. He was then led in procession, clad in sacred boughs, and solemnly cursed, and prayer was made that on him might fall the evils of the community. Then he was cast headlong down. Here the victim stood for the lives of the city and was a kind of scape-victim, ...
— The Religion of the Ancient Celts • J. A. MacCulloch

... reach their native land May long the joy of welcome feel— Beside the household gods may stand Grim Murther with awaiting steel; And they who 'scape the foe, may die Beneath the foul familiar glaive. Thus He[2] to whose prophetic eye Her light the wise Minerva gave:— "Ah! blest whose hearth, to memory true, The goddess keeps unstain'd and pure— For woman's guile is deep ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXXVIII. February, 1843. Vol. LIII. • Various

... Well, brother, rise, and raise your friend withall 180 From death to life: and, D'Ambois, let your life (Refin'd by passing through this merited death) Be purg'd from more such foule pollution; Nor on your scape, nor valour, more presuming To be again ...
— Bussy D'Ambois and The Revenge of Bussy D'Ambois • George Chapman

... to 'scape from fortune's rage, 'And bear the scars of envy, spite, and scorn, 'Yet with mankind no horrid war I wage, 'Yet with no impious spleen my breast is torn: 'For virtue lost, and ruined man, I mourn. 'O Man! creation's pride, heaven's darling child, 'Whom Nature's best, divinest, gifts adorn, 'Why ...
— The Minstrel; or the Progress of Genius - with some other poems • James Beattie

... golden opportunity Is never offered twice; seize then the hour When fortune smiles and duty points the way; Nor shrink aside to 'scape the spectre fear, Nor pause, though pleasure beckon from her bower; But bravely bear thee onward ...
— Architects of Fate - or, Steps to Success and Power • Orison Swett Marden

... not wait till I come back again. No, no; I have lost plenty of apples, and have long wanted to find the robbers out; now I've caught one I'll take care that he don't 'scape without apple-sauce, at all events—so come down, you young thief, come down directly—or it will be all the ...
— Mr. Midshipman Easy • Captain Frederick Marryat

... that he came to the end of it, for at least there was nothing which compromised him seriously with the king; but every nerve in his great body tingled with rage as he thought of the way in which his young scape-grace had alluded to him. "The viper!" he cried. "Oh, the foul snake in the grass! I will make him curse the day that he ...
— The Refugees • Arthur Conan Doyle

... come to that once that they take the Towne You will see Spanish Dons heads cryed up and downe: as they doe our Orenges and Lymons; and the woemens heads shall off, too,—not a maydenhead of gold shall scape 'em. ...
— A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. II • Various

... concernment of this battle had not been so exceeding great, he could scarce have wished the victory at the price he knew he must pay for it, in being subject to the reading and hearing of so many ill verses as he was sure would be made on that subject; adding, that no argument could 'scape some of these eternal rhymers, who watch a battle with more diligence than the ravens and birds of prey, and the worst of them surest to be first in upon the quarry; while the better able, either out of modesty writ not at all, or set that due value upon their ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 57, No. 352, February 1845 • Various

... was Cain's brand, "the iniquity of the fathers visited on the children;" others alleged more charitably that it ought to prove a sign in the Laird's favour, to have the symbol of his guilt transferred to a scape-goat—the brow of a child. However, the gossips need not have hidden the child's face so sedulously for the first few days from the mother. Mrs. Crawfurd took the matter quite peaceably, and was relieved that no worse misfortune had befallen her or her offspring. "Poor little ...
— Girlhood and Womanhood - The Story of some Fortunes and Misfortunes • Sarah Tytler

... energy, but others were mere placemen in need of a job. When the famous Countess of Blessington wished to aid one of her impecunious Irish relations, she had only to give a smile and a few soft words to the Duke of Wellington, and her scape-grace brother found himself quartered for life upon the revenues of Nova Scotia. Charles Duller, in his pamphlet Mr Mother Country of the Colonial Office, hardly exaggerated when he said that 'the patronage of the Colonial Office is the prey of every hungry department ...
— The Tribune of Nova Scotia - A Chronicle of Joseph Howe • W. L. (William Lawson) Grant

... forr to scape the brondeynge foe, As nere unto the byllowd beche I came, 705 Farr offe I spied a fyghte of myckle woe, Oure spyrynge battayles wrapte ynn sayles of flame. The burled Dacyannes, who were ynne the same, Fro syde to syde fledde the pursuyte ...
— The Rowley Poems • Thomas Chatterton

... the summary of all: "Give me, ye Gods, what I deserve"—Doiete moi ta opheilomena. The Christian's comment on this would be in the words of Hamlet's reply to Polonius: "God's bodkin, man! use every man after his desert and who should 'scape whipping?" ...
— The Religious Sentiment - Its Source and Aim: A Contribution to the Science and - Philosophy of Religion • Daniel G. Brinton

... crush. Wise leeches will not vain receipts obtrude, While growing pains pronounce the humours crude: Deaf to complaints, they wait upon the ill, Till some safe crisis authorise their skill. Nor could his acts too close a vizard wear, To 'scape their eyes whom guilt had taught to fear, 180 And guard with caution that polluted nest, Whence Legion twice before was dispossess'd: Once sacred house; which, when they enter'd in, They thought the place could sanctify ...
— The Poetical Works of John Dryden, Vol I - With Life, Critical Dissertation, and Explanatory Notes • John Dryden

... many, pale violet blue, or rarely white, in a long, loose raceme; perianth of 6 equal, narrowly oblong, widely spreading divisions, the thread-like filaments inserted at their bases; style thread-like, with 3-lobed stigma. Scape: 1 to 2 ft. high, from egg-shaped, nearly black bulb, 1 to 1 1/2 in. long. Leaves: Grass-like, shorter than flowering scape, from the base. Fruit: A 3-angled, oval capsule containing shining black seeds. Preferred Habitat - Meadows, prairies, and along banks of streams. Flowering ...
— Wild Flowers, An Aid to Knowledge of Our Wild Flowers and - Their Insect Visitors - - Title: Nature's Garden • Neltje Blanchan

... forecastle her swivel pealed, her burgee ran down the jack-staff, a soft, continuous tremor set in among all her parts, her scape-pipes ceased their alternating roars, her engines breathed quietly through her vast funnels, the flood spurted at her cutwater, white torrents leaped and chased each other from her fluttering wheels, her own breeze fanned every brow, and the ...
— Gideon's Band - A Tale of the Mississippi • George W. Cable

... at tellin' a story," the guide admitted. "Seems like he war askatin' home, arter killin' a deer, an' hed sum o' ther meat on his back, when ther wolves took arter him. They chased him right fast, and ther on'y way dad he cud 'scape ther fangs war by making a sharp turn every time they gut too clost. Yer see ther critters cudn't swerve fast enuff, an'd slide a long ways on ther ice 'cause it war so smooth. An' in that way he kept goin' till he gut nigh home; when sum o' ther neighbors, they kim out, ...
— The Boy Scouts in the Maine Woods - The New Test for the Silver Fox Patrol • Herbert Carter

... I!" Blount exploded. "Let it be understood, once for all, Mr. Bentley, that I am not the scape-goat for all the other departments! I have cut it off short; I am not recommending passes ...
— The Honorable Senator Sage-Brush • Francis Lynde

... a cast mistress, to your wicked friend; But find some new address, some fresh deceit, Nor practise such an antiquated cheat; These are the beaten methods of the stews, Stale forms, of course, all mean deceivers use, Who barbarously think to 'scape reproach, By prostituting her they first debauch. Thus did the Muse severe unkindly blame This offering long design'd to Congreve's fame; First chid the zeal as unpoetic fire, Which soon his merit forced her to inspire; Then call this verse, that speaks her largest aid, ...
— The Poems of Jonathan Swift, D.D., Volume I (of 2) • Jonathan Swift

... and weep for the wights I smite: Then, O Kurajan, tread the rightful road * And quit the paths of thy foul upright: Own the One True God, who dispread the skies * And made founts to flow and the hills pegged tight: An the slave embrace the True Faith, he'll 'scape * Hell pains and in Heaven be ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 7 • Richard F. Burton

... out in his dealings with women, and Lady Susan of late had been so unaccustomed to anything of the sort, that her heart began to warm to her scape-grace nephew. He was so distinguished-looking, too, with the beauty which comes of air and expression, and a certain winning manner, none of which were conspicuous attributes of the disciples of little Bethlehem. She ...
— Bluebell - A Novel • Mrs. George Croft Huddleston

... Berngerd thus: "Madam, crave something less of us, For many a maid lives 'neath our sway To 'scape from death could the like not pay." ...
— Queen Berngerd, The Bard and the Dreams - and other ballads • Thomas J. Wise

... reading than makes felons scape, Less human genius than God gives an ape, Small thanks to France, and none to Rome or Greece, A patch'd, vamp'd, future, old, revived new piece; 'Twixt Plautus, Fletcher, Congreve, and Corneille, Can make ...
— Calamities and Quarrels of Authors • Isaac D'Israeli

... this ideal aristocratic connection. Jack was a good fellow, a dear boy; and he added to his apparent amiabilities now by reiterating counsels of kindness and silence towards "poor dear sister Maria, whom he had been making the scape-goat all this time;" after which done, our stock-jobber feigned a pressing engagement with some fashionable friends, and left his father to ruminate upon his worth in ...
— The Complete Prose Works of Martin Farquhar Tupper • Martin Farquhar Tupper

... climate of Fernando Po, Mrs. Burton was, of course, unable to accompany him. They separated at Liverpool, 24th August 1861. An embrace, "a heart wrench;" and then a wave of the handkerchief, while "the Blackbird" African steam ship fussed its way out of the Mersey, having on board the British scape-goat sent away—"by the hand of a fit man"—one "Captain English"—into the wilderness of Fernando Po. "Unhappily," commented Burton, "I am not one of those independents who can say ce n'est que le premier pas qui coute." ...
— The Life of Sir Richard Burton • Thomas Wright

... came of being ill at ease: He hated that He cannot change His cold, Nor cure its ache. 'Hath spied an icy fish That longed to 'scape the rock-stream where she lived, And thaw herself within the lukewarm brine 35 O' the lazy sea her stream thrusts far amid, A crystal spike 'twixt two warm walls of wave; Only, she ever sickened, found repulse At the other kind of water, not her life, (Green-dense and dim-delicious, ...
— Selections from the Poems and Plays of Robert Browning • Robert Browning

... time I not care whether I lib or die, but at last I made up my mind to 'scape again. After six months dey took off de log, tinking dat I had had enuf of de mountains and would not try to 'scape, and de log prevented my doing so much work. De bery next night I ran away again but dis time I determined to make for ...
— By Sheer Pluck - A Tale of the Ashanti War • G. A. Henty

... presently to all our factories, acquaint them with these blessed tidings: If we can 'scape so cheap, 'twill be no matter what villanies henceforth ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Volume 5 (of 18) - Amboyna; The state of Innocence; Aureng-Zebe; All for Love • John Dryden

... delighted with him; their sympathy was gained; fear vanished; the Policeman, like a scape-goat, took all their sins away. They did not actually move closer to the Tramp but their eyes went nestling in and out among his tattered figure. Judy, however, it was noticeable, looked at him as though spell-bound. To her he was, perhaps, ...
— The Extra Day • Algernon Blackwood

... this retreat appears to be an error. There still remain some fragments of a priory. The Flat Holm, 2 m. farther off, though of about the same circumference (1-1/2 m.), is a far less imposing object in the sea-scape, but is more amenable to the influences of civilisation. It is occupied by a lighthouse and a farm, and is sometimes made the excuse for a channel trip by visitors from the neighbouring watering-places, as it affords amongst other attractions ...
— Somerset • G.W. Wade and J.H. Wade

... pleasant to recall what was done between the cedars and the shore. I do not attempt to justify our conduct. Does the physician justify medical experiments on the criminal, or the sacrificial priest the driving of the scape-goat into the wilderness? Suffice it to say, when I went down to the shore, Louis Laplante was sitting in the midst of empty drinking-flasks, and the wily, old Nor'-Wester was tempting the silly boy to take more by drinking his health with ...
— Lords of the North • A. C. Laut

... stringently applied.[162] By this stand the Professor places himself in sweet accord with the re-actionists of all shades, who otherwise are mortally opposed to him. Haeckel is of the opinion that incorrigible scape-graces must be uprooted like weeds that take from plants light, air and space. Had Haeckel turned his mind slightly toward social, instead of engaging it wholly with natural science, he would know that these criminals could, in most ...
— Woman under socialism • August Bebel

... his mighty bulk "Whole acres covering with pestiferous weight? "Content in vulgar hearts thy torch to flame, "To me the bow's superior glory leave." Then Venus' son: "O Phoebus, nought thy dart "Evades, nor thou canst 'scape the force of mine: "To thee as others yield,—so much my fame "Must ever thine transcend." Thus spoke the boy, And lightly mounting, cleaves the yielding air With beating wings, and on Parnassus' top Umbrageous rests. There from his quiver drew ...
— The Metamorphoses of Publius Ovidus Naso in English blank verse Vols. I & II • Ovid

... if he stay until the bloody flag Be once advanc'd on my vermilion tent, He dies, and those that kept us out so long; And, when they see me march in black array, With mournful streamers hanging down their heads, Were in that city all the world contain'd, Not one should scape, but ...
— Tamburlaine the Great, Part I. • Christopher Marlowe

... the Venice beaker, Bossed with masks, and flecked with gold, Scarce in time to 'scape the quicker Little fingers over-bold, Craving tendril-like to grasp it, with the will of ...
— What I Remember, Volume 2 • Thomas Adolphus Trollope

... the reduction of his multiple to one thousand." The Sunday School idea, with its principle "to each the income he deserves" is really too silly for discussion. Hamlet disposed of it three hundred years ago. "Use every man after his deserts, and who shall scape whipping?" Jesus remains unshaken as the practical man; and we stand exposed as the fools, the blunderers, the unpractical visionaries. The moment you try to reduce the Sunday School idea to figures you find that it brings ...
— Preface to Androcles and the Lion - On the Prospects of Christianity • George Bernard Shaw

... fool of a knight!" quoth Jocelyn. "So now will I show thee how by the wit of a brave and noble lady we may yet 'scape the ...
— The Geste of Duke Jocelyn • Jeffery Farnol

... although he had as many lives As a thousande widowes and a thousande wives, As a thousande lyons and a thousande rattes, A thousande wolves and a thousande cattes, A thousande bulles, and a thousande calves And a thousande legions divided in halves, He shall never 'scape death on my sworde's point Though I shoulde be torne ...
— History of English Humour, Vol. 1 (of 2) - With an Introduction upon Ancient Humour • Alfred Guy Kingan L'Estrange

... have you let the false enchanter scape? O ye mistook, ye should have snatcht his wand And bound him fast; without his rod revers't, And backward mutters of dissevering power, We cannot free the Lady that sits here In stony fetters fixt, and motionless; Yet stay, be not disturb'd, now I bethink me 820 Som other ...
— The Poetical Works of John Milton • John Milton

... scarce knowing what he did, (So goes the tale,) beneath the altar there In the high church the stiffening corpse he hid, And then, to 'scape that suffocating air, 460 Like a scared ghoul out of the porch he slid; But his strained eyes saw blood-spots everywhere, And ghastly faces thrust themselves between His soul and hopes of peace ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell • James Lowell

... citizen of Thebes) This proclamation I address to all:— Thebans, if any knows the man by whom Laius, son of Labdacus, was slain, I summon him to make clean shrift to me. And if he shrinks, let him reflect that thus Confessing he shall 'scape the capital charge; For the worst penalty that shall befall him Is banishment—unscathed he shall depart. But if an alien from a foreign land Be known to any as the murderer, Let him who knows speak out, and he shall ...
— The Oedipus Trilogy • Sophocles

... death in the Strand—seeing that the stake is precisely the same—should be quite as enthralling as a hairbreadth 'scape on the plains of Texas, even though the gambler wears a top-hat instead of sheepskin ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 152. January 17, 1917 • Various

... in their light, and heaven waxed dim, And sighs did raise a tempest, causing fears; The naked boy could not so wield his arms, But that the waves were masters of his might, And threatened him to work far greater harms If he devised not to scape by flight: Then for a boat his quiver stood instead, His bow unbent did serve him for a mast, Whereby to sail his cloth of veil he spread, His shafts for oars on either board he cast: From shipwreck safe this wag got thus ...
— Lyrics from the Song-Books of the Elizabethan Age • Various

... man stood dressing his sunny vine: 110 'Halloo! old fellow with the crooked shoulder! You grub those stumps? before they will bear wine Methinks even you must grow a little older: Attend, I pray, to this advice of mine, As you would 'scape what might appal a bolder— 115 Seeing, see not—and hearing, hear not—and— If you ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume I • Percy Bysshe Shelley

... crooked fingers. Crooked fingers hard as iron, Took the hundred nets, and spread them Right across the stream of Tuoni, Both across and also lengthwise, And in an oblique direction So that Vaino should not 'scape him, Nor should flee Uvantolainen, In the course of all his lifetime, While the golden moon is shining, 360 From the dread abode of Tuoni, From ...
— Kalevala, Volume I (of 2) - The Land of the Heroes • Anonymous

... "If he does na find pleasure enough in his work, his book, and his home, he shall na seek it of low rogues and strolling scape-graces." ...
— Master Skylark • John Bennett

... strong conviction that efforts were being made, by whom I knew not, to turn the whole force of thought upon me and make of me a scape goat in the matter. I retired, but not to shut my eyes in sleep for the night. For a time my mind remained in confusion about those lectures, but after resting awhile, and the excitement had passed off, all came clearly to view, as given on ...
— The Prison Chaplaincy, And Its Experiences • Hosea Quinby

... have mercy!' cried the duchess, joining her hands. 'Have ye, scape-graces indeed, brought your gallants hither? I dare not inquire further. May be, ye have hidden them in your chambers? Meggy (the duchess's nurse), beg his lordship to come hither; I must talk the matter over ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 2, No. 12, May, 1851. • Various

... the bough burst forth, As wildly rang that Runic strain; Sir Thunye fiercely spurred his steed, But, ah! to ’scape he strove in vain. ...
— Ermeline - a ballad - - - Translator: George Borrow • Thomas J. Wise

... and I urged him to do so, but he stood mute and shuffled from the point. Now, for the first time, I began to discover that it was all a hoax, and that the patriotic Irishman was nothing more nor less than a scape-goat, a mere tool in the hands of the White Lion club, or ministerial faction; a mere scarecrow, whom they had set up to deter any other person from offering himself, or rather to prevent the freemen from seeking another ...
— Memoirs of Henry Hunt, Esq. Volume 2 • Henry Hunt

... seek out "Mary Stuart." All hope of a comfortable future was not lost. "Mary Stuart" must provide for her scape-goat. It should be her pleasing duty to clothe and feed that hapless animal for the ...
— The Missing Link • Edward Dyson

... the faces, and running under the petticoats of the people, and creating altogether the most abominable din and confusion which it is possible for a reasonable person to conceive. And to make matters still more distressing, the rascally little scape-grace in the steeple was evidently exerting himself to the utmost. Every now and then one might catch a glimpse of the scoundrel through the smoke. There he sat in the belfry upon the belfry-man, who was lying flat upon his back. ...
— The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 4 (of 5) of the Raven Edition • Edgar Allan Poe

... the receiving of stolen goods; When he was rogue Wellborn, no man would believe him, And then his information could not hurt us: But now he is right worshipful again. Who dares but doubt his testimony? Methinks I see thee, Froth, already in a cart, And my hand hissing (if I 'scape the halter) With the letter ...
— The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor, Vol. I, No. 4, April 1810 • Various

... at our calamities, And count'st us happy to 'scape prisonment? Why, the wide world, that blesseth some with weal,[106] Is to our ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. IX • Various

... but wine which never grew In the belly of the grape, Or grew on vine whose tap-roots, reaching through, Under the Andes to the Cape, Suffer no savor of the earth to scape. ...
— Poems - Household Edition • Ralph Waldo Emerson

... Children should love these Himalayan sketches, for Mr. RUNDALL, from material which in some cases was admittedly slight, could weave a tale full of magic and charm. The story of the old brown bear in "The Scape-goat" may not greatly stir the heart with the thrill of adventure, but the hero has attractions that no child and no man that has not forgotten his childhood could resist. An inconspicuous notice in the book tells us that the ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 150, January 5, 1916 • Various

... were invited to your prodigal feasts, (Wherein the phoenix scarce could 'scape your throats) Laugh at your misery, as fore-deeming you An idle meteor, which drawn forth, the earth Would be soon ...
— The White Devil • John Webster

... Madam, will you do? Just gods! But someone comes. Go, fly from shame, You cannot 'scape if ...
— Phaedra • Jean Baptiste Racine

... be from Picardy).[13] Oh! Aa can stand nowt more; aa'm rait winded! Ah! good for nowt, thou's made me run well for it; thou'lt not 'scape me now. Joostice! Joostice! Aa forbid the weddin. (To ORONTE) He's my ain man, Mast-ther, and as sh'd joost loik to ave him stroong up, the precious ...
— Monsieur de Pourceaugnac • Moliere

... council of ministers, an armed intervention of the Piedmontese troops in Tuscany, thus willing to cause civil war, and, at this great moment, to see Italian blood shed by Italian hands, was treachery. I think, indeed, he has been probably made the scape-goat in that affair; that Charles Albert planned the measure, and, finding himself unable to carry it out, in consequence of the vigilance and indignant opposition of the Chamber of Deputies, was somewhat consoled by making it an occasion to victimize the "Illustrious," whom four weeks before ...
— At Home And Abroad - Or, Things And Thoughts In America and Europe • Margaret Fuller Ossoli

... That such a scape-grace should enter the army can occasion no surprise. His robust, hardy frame, used to exposure in all weathers—his daring courage, as displayed in his perilous dealing with the adder, bordering upon fool-hardiness—his mental depravity and immoral ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... when locked are inclined 12deg. from EB, and FB. In the case of the engaging pallet it inclines toward the center A. The draw is produced on account of MA being longer than RA, consequently, when power is applied to the scape tooth S, the pallet is drawn into the wheel. The disengaging pallet inclines in the same direction but away from the center A; the reason is obvious from the former explanation. Some people imagine that the greater the incline ...
— An Analysis of the Lever Escapement • H. R. Playtner

... for the loss of the forts fell of course upon Schuyler, who was none too popular in Congress, and who with St. Clair was accordingly made a scape-goat. Congress voted that Washington should appoint a new commander, and the New England delegates visited him to urge the selection of Gates. This task Washington refused to perform, alleging as a reason that the northern department had always ...
— George Washington, Vol. I • Henry Cabot Lodge

... thy beauty to array My wounded heart in armour fancy-wrought: For, lacking thee, so low my state is brought, That Love hath stolen all my strength away; Whence, when I fain would halve my griefs, they weigh With double sorrow, and I sink to nought. Thus all in vain my soul to scape thee flies, For ever faster flies her beauteous foe: From the swift-footed feebly run the slow! Yet with his hands Love wipes my weeping eyes, Saying, this toil will end in happy cheer; What costs the heart so ...
— Sonnets • Michael Angelo Buonarroti & Tommaso Campanella

... enough to stow Queen Mab in— Who the deuce can harbour there?" "Who, sir? plenty— Nobles twenty Did at once my vessel fill."— "Did they? Jesus, How you squeeze us! Would to God they did so still! Then I'd 'scape the heat and racket Of the ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Vol. 7. - Poetry • George Gordon Byron

... circumstances is it likely that Madame Sand would not very soon have become disgusted with active politics, for which her temperament unfitted her in every respect. Impetuous and uncompromisingly sincere, she was predestined to burn her fingers; proud and independent, to become something of a scape-goat, charged with all the follies and errors which she repudiated, as well as with those for which she was ...
— Famous Women: George Sand • Bertha Thomas

... the army, and when violence reigns murder may show its face, but pardon must be stealthy. So Burdo was kept in confinement and only released after victory had allayed the soldiers' rancour. Meanwhile a centurion, named Crispinus, was offered as a scape-goat. He had actually stained his hands with Capito's blood, so his guilt seemed more obvious to those who clamoured for his punishment, and Vitellius felt he ...
— Tacitus: The Histories, Volumes I and II • Caius Cornelius Tacitus

... or Death no obstacle entwine With the new web which here my fingers fold, And if I 'scape from beauty's tyrant hold While natural truth with truth reveal'd I join, Perchance a work so double will be mine Between our modern style and language old, That (timidly I speak, with hope though bold) Even to Rome its growing fame may shine: But, since, ...
— The Sonnets, Triumphs, and Other Poems of Petrarch • Petrarch

... dull, dreary rooms, where I had no employment and no resources. That is, the woman did it. My husband, after settling us in a house in London, disappeared, and I saw no more of him. I know now he wished to keep himself irresponsible for my imprisonment. She would have been the scape-goat, had any legal difficulties arisen. He was anxious to retain all his rights ...
— The Doctor's Dilemma • Hesba Stretton

... to clay, And many of my mates are gone; My youngers daily drop away, And can I think to 'scape alone? No, no; I know that I must die, And yet ...
— Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Complete • George Gilfillan

... scarce 'scape whipping, even at Stratford Free School. In the same way he makes the penultimate syllable of ...
— Shakespeare, Bacon and the Great Unknown • Andrew Lang

... conquest were this heart! I am resolved I'll try my utmost art: In gaining him, I gain that fortune too, Which he has wedded, and which I but woo. I'll try each secret passage to his mind, And love's soft bands about his heart-strings wind. Not his vowed constancy shall 'scape my snare; While he without resistance does prepare, I'll melt into him ere his love's aware. [She makes a gesture of invitation to ALMANZOR, who ...
— The Works Of John Dryden, Volume 4 (of 18) - Almanzor And Almahide, Marriage-a-la-Mode, The Assignation • John Dryden

... boat I shipped on was the Walnut Hills, at $7 per month. You could hear her "scape" (whistle) for a distance of twenty miles on a clear day or night. I would get up early in the morning and make some "five-cent pieces" (there were no nickels in those ...
— Forty Years a Gambler on the Mississippi • George H. Devol

... the Capitol in flame, Girt with her foul emasculate throng, By Fortune's sweet new wine befool'd, In hope's ungovern'd weakness strong To hope for all; but soon she cool'd, To see one ship from burning 'scape; Great Caesar taught her dizzy brain, Made mad by Mareotic grape, To feel the sobering truth of pain, And gave her chase from Italy, As after doves fierce falcons speed, As hunters 'neath Haemonia's sky Chase the tired hare, so might he lead The fiend enchain'd; ...
— Odes and Carmen Saeculare of Horace • Horace

... Miss Europa, Miss Europa gave it Minos, Minos gave it Procris, Procris gave it Cephalus. He was also of the fairy kind; so that, like the lawyers of our age, he was too hard for all other sorts of creatures; nothing could scape the dog. Now who should happen to meet but these two? What do you think they did? Dog by his destiny was to take fox, and fox by his fate was ...
— Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete. • Francois Rabelais

... not know me, boy; and well for thee Thou dost not. I'm the father of a son About thy age. Thou, I see, wast horn, like him, upon the hills: If thou shouldst 'scape thy present thraldom, he May chance to cross thee; if he should, I pray thee Relate to him what has been passing here, And say I laid my hand upon thy head, And said to thee, if he were here, as thou art, Thus would I bless him. ...
— McGuffey's Fifth Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... prize, which was robbed ob eberyting ob value on board, and was den treated same as Les deux Amis had been. I was very glad to get off wid my life, but I berry much wish myself out of de ship again, and determined to make my 'scape as ...
— The Missing Ship - The Log of the "Ouzel" Galley • W. H. G. Kingston

... perhaps the most fragrant flower we have. In a warm, moist atmosphere, its odor is almost too strong. It is a plant with a slender, leafless stalk or scape less than a foot high, with two or more large yellow hood or helmet shaped flowers. It is not common, and belongs pretty well north, growing in sandy swamps and along the marshy margins of lakes and ponds. Its perfume is sweet and spicy in an eminent degree. I have ...
— The Writings of John Burroughs • John Burroughs

... goats to be let loose, and driven beyond the boundary, and that he, the incarnation of the evil, will go with them. Of course, the scourge diminishes from that day. Several who have witnessed this practice in India, have been struck with the remarkable analogy it bears to the scape-goat of the Mosaic dispensation, sent into the wilderness burdened with the sins ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 457 - Volume 18, New Series, October 2, 1852 • Various

... prophet here compares Israel to the scape goat, who had the sins of the people-laid upon him, and was ...
— Five Pebbles from the Brook • George Bethune English

... fleer! though thou 'scape Our ambush on thy devil's racer, Caught here upon this marshy cape, Thy bones the muskrat's brood shall scrape, The sturgeon suck—Death thy embracer!" So shouts each ...
— Tales of the Chesapeake • George Alfred Townsend

... Will place thee with the worthiest of that sect. Then let not ignorance, nor enuie mooue thee Thou hast done well, they do not that reproue thee: Yet some (true worth nere wants an opposite) will Carpers be: Grieue not at this, not vertues selfe can scape their obloquie, But giue the raynes vnto these baser spirits, Whose Iudgements cannot paralell thy merrits, Such fooles (to seeme iudicious) take in hand, To censure what they doe not vnderstand. Yet cannot they detract, or wrong thy worth, maugre their spight: For thou doost chaunt incestuous ...
— Seven Minor Epics of the English Renaissance (1596-1624) • Dunstan Gale

... I had not been able to recall Job's instructions in opening the latch; at last I remembered, and pressed, the screw—the latch rose—I opened the door; but not wide enough to scape through the aperture. The ruffians saw my escape at hand. "Rush the b—cove! rush him!" cried the loud voice of one behind; and at the word, Fib was thrown forwards upon the extended edge of my blade; scarcely with an effort of my own arm, the sword entered his bosom, and he fell at my ...
— Pelham, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... never offered twice; seize, then, the hour When fortune smiles, and duty points the way; Nor shrink aside to 'scape the specter fear, Nor pause, though pleasure beckon from her bower; But bravely bear thee ...
— Pushing to the Front • Orison Swett Marden

... first, he hears the distant hum, And feels them fluttering as they nearer come; They buzz and blink, and doubtfully they tread On the strong bird-lime of the utmost thread; But when they're once entangled by the gin, With what an eager clasp he draws them in; Nor shall they 'scape, till after long delay, And all that sweetens life is drawn away. "Nay, this," you cry, "is common-place, the tale Of petty tradesmen o'er their evening ale; There are who, living by the legal pen, Are held in honour,—'Honourable ...
— The Borough • George Crabbe

... write their wrongs in marble: he more just, Stoop'd down serene and wrote them in the dust,— Trod under foot, the sport of every wind, Swept from the earth and blotted from his mind. There, secret in the grave, he bade them lie, And grieved they could not 'scape the Almighty eye. ...
— Familiar Quotations • John Bartlett

... he coniurd me to make no man liuing priuie to his departure in regard of his place and charge, and on his honour assured mee his returne shoulde bee verie short and succesfull, I, I, shorter by the necke, thought I, in the meane time let this be thy posie, I liue in hope to scape the rope. ...
— The Vnfortunate Traveller, or The Life Of Jack Wilton - With An Essay On The Life And Writings Of Thomas Nash By Edmund Gosse • Thomas Nash

... ought not to be listened to; approves of the plan of repaying Spain her advances.—M. Cabarrus wishes a reconciliation.—Letter from Mr Jay to M. Cabarras (Madrid, April 2d, 1782), in reply to his claims for gratitude; his conduct requires an apology.—M. Cabarras was the scape-goat of the Minister.—Messrs Drouilhet employed as American bankers.—Mr Jay does not wait on the Minister while the Court is at Madrid.—Receives an invitation to appear on Saturdays at the Minister's table.—No advantage to be gained ...
— The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution, Vol. VIII • Various

... from the Bull-Dog banished him from the quarter-deck and sowed within him the seeds of that discontent which fourteen years later made of him, as he himself expressed it, "a scape-goat for the sins of many." [Footnote: Admiralty Records 1. 5339—Dying Declaration of the Late Unfortunate Richard Parker, 28 June 1797.] He was now, for what reason we do not learn, rated as an ordinary seaman, and ...
— The Press-Gang Afloat and Ashore • John R. Hutchinson

... Some innocents 'scape not the thunderbolt. Melt Egypt into Nile! and kindly creatures Turn all to serpents! Call the slave again; Though I am mad, I will not ...
— Characteristics of Women - Moral, Poetical, and Historical • Anna Jameson

... her heart is pleased, When she beholds, she can but smile for glee. Was no pagan of such high chivalry. Comes through the press, above them all cries he, "Be not at all dismayed, King Marsilie! To Rencesvals I go, and Rollanz, he Nor Oliver may scape alive from me; The dozen peers are doomed to martyry. See here the sword, whose hilt is gold indeed, I got in gift from the admiral of Primes; In scarlat blood I pledge it shall be steeped. Franks shall be slain, and France abased be. To Charles the old, with his great blossoming beard, ...
— The Song of Roland • Anonymous

... chill here; you want the sun That shines at court; make ready for the journey. Pray God, we 'scape ...
— Queen Mary and Harold • Alfred Lord Tennyson



Words linked to "Scape" :   pillar, vertical, peduncle, stalk, stem, architecture, upright, column, flower stalk



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