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Repine   Listen
Repine

verb
1.
Express discontent.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Repine" Quotes from Famous Books



... repine because of these things. Let the Grand Mujik mutter a thousand heresies, let three-quarters of the world accept and live them, you would not think the unaspiring three-quarters broken-spirited. You would hail them right practical. And if you held a thought as firmly as your ...
— The Kempton-Wace Letters • Jack London

... that he had a pretty daughter, it was natural that the young Staveleys and Sophia Furnival should know each other. But poor Mrs. Furnival was too ponderous for this mounting late in life, and she had not been asked to Noningsby. She was much too good a mother to repine at her daughter's promised gaiety. Sophia was welcome to go; but by all the laws of God and man it would behove her lord and husband to eat his ...
— Orley Farm • Anthony Trollope

... Salutes the reader's eye, Here (in deep silence) precious dust doth lye, Obscurely Sleeping in Death's mighty store, Mingled with common earth till time's no more. Against Death's Stubborne laws, who dares repine, Since So much Merrett did his ...
— At the Sign of the Barber's Pole - Studies In Hirsute History • William Andrews

... depth of my prayer I suffer much. Take me only awhile. No fellow-being will receive me. I cannot pause; they will not detain me by their love. Take me awhile, and again I will go forth on a renewed service. It is not that I repine, my Father, but I sink from want of rest, and none will shelter me. Thou knowest it all. Bathe me in the living waters of ...
— Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Vol. II • Margaret Fuller Ossoli

... Though Love repine, and Reason chafe, There came a voice without reply,— 'Tis man's perdition to be safe, When for the truth he ...
— Daily Strength for Daily Needs • Mary W. Tileston

... decade of the twentieth century was distinguished as the age when the auto and tango came into use, and people learned to fly, and grown men wore bracelet watches and carried their handkerchiefs up their cuffs; and they will repine because they, too, did not live in those stirring times. But we of the present generation who recently passed through these experiences have already accepted them without undue excitement, just as our forefathers in their day accepted the submarine ...
— Roughing it De Luxe • Irvin S. Cobb

... should we fret and vex ourselves because we have had no part in framing them, nor anything to do with their administration. When the fruits of the earth are fully afforded us, we do not wantonly refuse them, nor ungratefully repine because we have done nothing towards the cultivation of the tree which produces them. No, we accept them with lively gratitude; and their sweetness is not embittered by reflecting upon the manner in which they were obtained. It is the dictate of ...
— Twenty-Two Years a Slave, and Forty Years a Freeman • Austin Steward

... Oswald Bastable, and another very nice writer. Oswald was to keep his birthday on the Saturday, so that his Father could be there. A birthday when there are only many happy returns is a little like Sunday or Christmas Eve. Oswald had a birthday-card or two—that was all; but he did not repine, because he knew they always make it up to you for putting off keeping your birthday, and he looked forward ...
— The Wouldbegoods • E. Nesbit

... robe, and, muttering low, Scanned me, with half-shut eyes, from top to toe: Brought all her woman's witcheries into play, Still smiling in a set sarcastic way, Till my blood boiled, my visage crimson grew With indignation, as a rose with dew: And so she left me, inly to repine That such as she could flout such ...
— Theocritus • Theocritus

... ineffectual, efforts to change it. The modest lady pities, and blushes for, a sister thus regardless of proprieties. Her companions, successful by their very neglect to toil for success, will doubtless apply to her, and with some pungency, the epithet of "old maid." Ought she to repine at the fruit of her own ...
— The Young Maiden • A. B. (Artemas Bowers) Muzzey

... of foreign travel. I wish that to be understood. It is owing to her father's deliberate choice that Ireen and I have been imprisoned in the narrow limits of Millbrook society. For myself I do not complain. If Mr. Carstyle chooses to place others before his wife it is not for his wife to repine. His course may be noble—Quixotic; I do not allow myself to pronounce judgment on it, though others have thought that in sacrificing his own family to strangers he was violating the most sacred obligations of domestic life. This is the opinion of my pastor and of other valued friends; ...
— The Greater Inclination • Edith Wharton

... can touch Dickens in indicating this sort of familiar sorcery and the secret of its terror. For it is children, more than any, who are conscious how "haunted" all manner of places and things are. And people themselves! The searching psychologists are led singularly astray. They peer and pry and repine, and all the while the real essence of the figure lies in its momentary ...
— Visions and Revisions - A Book of Literary Devotions • John Cowper Powys

... than was necessary for one occasion," said Alida, smiling on her admirer, in a manner that left him doubtful whether he ought most to repine, or to rejoice. "Thank you, good Francois; your duty for the night shall end with lighting the captain ...
— The Water-Witch or, The Skimmer of the Seas • James Fenimore Cooper

... to spare this morning I devote them to your benefit, with a fond hope that you are as happy as the day is long. It does seem rather hard for me to be moping around this quiet house and my little girl away in New Brunswick, but it is useless to repine. In a few days I will take charge of a ship to go abroad for some months. Our fleet now demands my attention, which, I am happy to say, will drive away loneliness and repinings for the little runaway. Was much ...
— Lady Rosamond's Secret - A Romance of Fredericton • Rebecca Agatha Armour

... surprised to hear the doctor preach. He says we ought to be thankful; we have hitherto been richly and bountifully provided for; we ought not to repine, nor doubt, seeing we have the same Providence to depend upon; that we ought not to set our hearts upon any thing in this world; being very short-sighted, we cannot know what is proper for us. Having done for the best, when we are disappointed, we ought to rest satisfied that ...
— The Power of Faith - Exemplified In The Life And Writings Of The Late Mrs. Isabella Graham. • Isabella Graham

... disturbance ever since, from the reluctance I feel to the separation it will cause me from all my friends. Those, indeed, whom I most love, I shall be able to invite to me in the palace - but I see little or no possibility of being able to make what I most value, excursions into the country. . . . I repine at losing my loved visits to Mickleham, Norbury, Chesington, Twickenham, and Ayle sham ; all these I must ...
— The Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay Volume 1 • Madame D'Arblay

... to me— 'Tis true he drank my wine; But, as I found it disagree, I don't so much repine: 'Tis true we missed a little plate When he gave us the sack. But "all things come to them that wait"— Oh, bring my ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 103, August 20, 1892 • Various

... repine, Traverse; these things go by fate. It was your destiny—let us hope it will prove a ...
— Capitola the Madcap • Emma D. E. N. Southworth

... through chance of circumstance We have to go bare-foot, sir, We'll not repine — a friend of mine Has got no feet to boot, sir. This Happiness a habit is, And Life is what we make it: See! there's the trail to Sunnydale! Up, friend! ...
— Rhymes of a Rolling Stone • Robert W. Service

... said the patient querulously, "I have no interest in these false descriptions of the life I have led. I know that life's worth. Ah! had I been trained to some employment, some profession! had I—well—it is weak to repine. Mother, tell me, you have seen Mons. de Vaudemont: is he strong ...
— Night and Morning, Volume 5 • Edward Bulwer Lytton

... ask another to adore it or amuse it; Mt. Shasta, though it towers for thousands of feet above its neighbors, does not repine that it is alone or that the adjacent peaks see much that it misses under the clouds. Nature does not trouble itself about what the rest of nature is doing. But man constantly worries about other men—what they think of him, do to him, fail to emulate ...
— It Can Be Done - Poems of Inspiration • Joseph Morris

... interested and absorbed her, so that she had little time for dangerous thoughts or vain regrets. As he once said, Mr. Power made her own troubles seem light by showing her others so terribly real and great that she was ashamed to repine ...
— Work: A Story of Experience • Louisa May Alcott

... great theatre of this earth among the numberless number of men, to die were only proper to thee and thine, then undoubtedly thou had reason to repine at so severe and partial a law. But since it is a necessity, from which never any age by-past hath been exempted, and unto which they which be, and so many as are to come, are thralled (no consequent of life being more common and familiar), why shouldst thou with unprofitable ...
— A Book of English Prose - Part II, Arranged for Secondary and High Schools • Percy Lubbock

... but this is no hour for sorrow; They died at their duty, shall we repine? Let us gaze hopefully on to the morrow Praying that our lives thus shall shine. Ring out your bugles, sound out your cheers! Man has been God-like so may we be. Give cheering thanks, there dry up those tears, Widowed and orphaned, ...
— Violets and Other Tales • Alice Ruth Moore

... now is come our joyful'st feast; Let every man be jolly; Each room with ivy leaves is drest, And every post with holly. Though some churls at our mirth repine, Round your foreheads garlands twine; Drown sorrow in a cup of wine, And ...
— Christmas: Its Origin and Associations - Together with Its Historical Events and Festive Celebrations During Nineteen Centuries • William Francis Dawson

... "Do not repine, Edward," said Jane, gently "Those bleaching bones we passed indicate that others have fared worse than we have', for we ...
— The American Family Robinson - or, The Adventures of a Family lost in the Great Desert of the West • D. W. Belisle

... should not repine. If people would repine less and try harder to get up an appetite by persweating in someone's vineyard at so much per diem, it would be better. The American people of late years seem to have a deeper and deadlier repugnance for mannish industry, and there seems to be a growing opinion ...
— Remarks • Bill Nye

... maiden the chariot fall, As a thundercloud swings on the moon. Forth, free of the deluge, one cry From the vanishing gallop rose clear: And: Skiegeneia! the sky Rang; Skiegeneia! the sphere. And she left him therewith, to rejoice, Repine, yearn, and know not his aim, The life of their day in her voice, Left her ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... visions of my childhood, which, like the fine colours we see when our eyes are shut, are vanished for ever. Many trials and sad experience have so undeceived me by degrees, that I am utterly at a loss at what rate to value myself. As for fame, I shall be glad of any I can get, and not repine at any I miss; and as for vanity, I have enough to keep me from hanging myself, or even from wishing those hanged who would take it away. It was this that made me write. The sense of my ...
— The Poetical Works Of Alexander Pope, Vol. 1 • Alexander Pope et al

... watched the ship in which her husband sailed until it vanished from sight, shed a few tears, heaved a few sighs and went home to see if the negro slave had prepared breakfast. She smiled next day, and before the week was past she was quite gay. She said she was not going to repine and ...
— The Real America in Romance, Volume 6; A Century Too Soon (A Story - of Bacon's Rebellion) • John R. Musick

... my sweet friend. Relinquishing my love, I gave my dearest hope of joy to her. If God, from out his boundless store above, Had chosen added blessings to confer, I would rejoice, for her sake—not repine That th' ...
— Maurine and Other Poems • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... am I burdened with cares that borrow Their color from a world of strife. The fields are burdened with toil, The seas are sown with the dead, With never a hand of a priest to assoil A soul that in sin hath fled. I have gold: I dread the danger by night; I have none: I repine and fret; I have children: they darken the pale sunlight; I have none: I'm in nature's debt. The young lack wisdom; the old lack life; I have brains; but I shake at the knees; Alas! who could covet a scene of strife? Give me peace in ...
— My New Curate • P.A. Sheehan

... art thou thus alone? Let Doues so mourn girle, yt hath lost their mates Thine is to come, then prethee cease thy mone, Care shold not dwel with great & high estates. Let her that needs and is not faire at all, Repine at fortune, loue shall be thy thrall, wing'd as he is, and armed thou shalt see, (I haue the power to ...
— Seven Minor Epics of the English Renaissance (1596-1624) • Dunstan Gale

... "I know to repine is useless," he said; "time and industry will repair my loss; and, though I feel it now severely, it may in the end be for the best: for I own I was too proud and too fond of my garden; and often dedicated hours to that, which I might ...
— The Little Quaker - or, the Triumph of Virtue. A Tale for the Instruction of Youth • Susan Moodie

... scourge, the thorns, the deep disgrace, These thou could'st bear, nor once repine; But when Jehovah veiled his face, Unutterable pangs ...
— The Otterbein Hymnal - For Use in Public and Social Worship • Edmund S. Lorenz

... it, or even not been able to get it at all. Very bitterly William blamed himself then for disregarding his own part of the suggested plan. If only he had worn the pink himself!—but he had not; and it was useless to repine. In the meantime, where was ...
— Miss Billy • Eleanor H. Porter

... neere her middle line, Youthfully lustie in her strongest age, When one of Spaynes great Gallions did repine, That one should many vnto death ingage, And therefore with her force, halfe held diuine, At once euaporates her mortall rage, Till powerfull Grinuille, yeelding power a toombe Splyt her, & sunck her in the ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of The English Nation, v. 7 - England's Naval Exploits Against Spain • Richard Hakluyt

... masks which conceal A dead hope in their hearts. The strange fancy clings To the mind of the world that the rarest of things— Contentment—is commonplace; and, that to shine As something superior, one must repine, Or seem to be hiding an ache in the breast. Yet the commonest thing in the world is unrest, If you want to be really unique, go along And act as if Fate had not done you a wrong, And declare you have had your ...
— Three Women • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... her resolve to leave school, did not repine, and no one, not even her mother, knew how hard the struggle had been. It all came out afterward that, John Watson, too, in his quiet way, had been thinking of the advantages of farm life for his growing family. So when Pearl proposed it he ...
— The Second Chance • Nellie L. McClung

... we must not repine," answered Sayd; "and as we have to remain, we must lose no time in fortifying our camp to protect ourselves against wild beasts ...
— Ned Garth - Made Prisoner in Africa. A Tale of the Slave Trade • W. H. G. Kingston

... eyes whatsoever the distance be; My heart must ever dwell on the memories of your tribe; * And the turtle-dove reneweth all as oft as moaneth she: Ho thou dove, who passest night-tide in calling on thy fere, * Thou doublest my repine, bringing grief for company; And leavest thou mine eyelids with weeping unfulfilled * For the dearlings who departed, whom we never more may see: I melt for the thought of you at every time and hour, * And I long for you when Night showeth cheek of ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 8 • Richard F. Burton

... in that old day Thou mournest, did thy sire repine; So, in his time, thy child grown gray Shall sigh ...
— The Complete Works of Whittier - The Standard Library Edition with a linked Index • John Greenleaf Whittier

... a feeling of suddenness and incompleteness and a natural pang of wonder and regret for a life so richly and so vitally endowed thus cut off in its prime. But for us it is not fitting to question or repine, but rather to rejoice in the rare possession that we hold. What is any life, even the most rounded and complete, but a fragment and a hint? What Emma Lazarus might have accomplished, had she been spared, it is idle and even ungrateful to speculate. ...
— The Poems of Emma Lazarus - Vol. II. (of II.), Jewish Poems: Translations • Emma Lazarus

... during three months and two long vacations I have made but a retrograde course. If I enter into competition for university honors I shall kill myself. Could I twine, to gratify my friends, a laurel with the cypress I would not repine; but to sacrifice the little inward peace which the wreck of passion has left behind, and relinquish every hope of future excellence and future usefulness in one wild and unavailing pursuit, were indeed a madman's act, and ...
— The International Monthly, Volume 3, No. 1, April, 1851 • Various

... it, I must and will!' said he, lifting his head from the carved chimney-piece, where he had been resting it. 'I have been in will a murderer myself, and what right have I to repine like the Israelites, with their self-justifying proverb? No; let me be thankful that I was not given up even then, but have been able to repent, and do a little better next time. It will be a blessing as yet ungranted to any of ...
— The Heir of Redclyffe • Charlotte M. Yonge

... earnestly:—'It shall be mine, 1000 This task,—mine, Laon!—thou hast much to gain; Nor wilt thou at poor Cythna's pride repine, If she should lead a happy female train To meet thee over the rejoicing plain, When myriads at thy call shall throng around 1005 The Golden City.'—Then the child did strain My arm upon her tremulous heart, and wound Her own about ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume I • Percy Bysshe Shelley

... troubles, as we all have,—his having arisen chiefly from want of that higher ecclesiastical promotion which his soul had coveted, and for which the whole tenour of his life had especially fitted him. Now, in his green old age, he had ceased to covet, but had not ceased to repine. He had ceased to covet aught for himself, but still coveted much for his children; and for him such a marriage as this which was now suggested for his son, was encompassed almost with the bitterness of death. "I think it would kill me," he said to his wife; "by heavens, I think ...
— The Last Chronicle of Barset • Anthony Trollope

... and sons of hell Gaze at thy goodness and repine To see my table spread so well With living bread ...
— The Psalms of David - Imitated in the Language of The New Testament - And Applied to The Christian State and Worship • Isaac Watts

... effects of injured Innocence, may soften the jealous Husband into Pity, make him sensible of the Wrong he does you, and work out of his Mind all those Fears and Suspicions that make you both unhappy. At least it will have this good Effect, that he will keep his Jealousy to himself, and repine in private, either because he is sensible it is a Weakness, and will therefore hide it from your Knowledge, or because he will be apt to fear some ill Effect it may produce, in cooling your Love towards him, or diverting it ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... mother, dear sister mine, Blue-eyed maid at the bridge-house, my fair one. Weep not, ye must not at parting repine, I go to seek fortune, ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... laughing, and giving her another hug; "but, being a man, it wouldn't do at all to allow my feelings to overcome me in that manner. Besides, with my darling little wife still left me, I'd be an ungrateful wretch to repine at the absence ...
— Elsie's Kith and Kin • Martha Finley

... presently, shut her mouth on a sob, and went resolutely about her work. We had, after all, a tolerably cheerful evening in the kitchen. It seemed wisest for me not to show myself again before Captain Pendarves, but I am afraid I did not repine greatly at the banishment. As the door swung to and fro behind Mary carrying their dishes, I caught glimpses of the gloomy parlor, my grandfather huddled in his chair by the table, with bright, roving eyes; the sorcerer surprisingly busy about the ...
— McClure's Magazine, Vol 31, No 2, June 1908 • Various

... Never pausing to repine, he orders Hennepin, the friar, to take two voyageurs and descend Illinois River as far as the Mississippi. Tonty he leaves in charge of the Illinois fort. He {139} himself proceeds overland the width of half a continent, to Fort Frontenac ...
— Canada: the Empire of the North - Being the Romantic Story of the New Dominion's Growth from Colony to Kingdom • Agnes C. Laut

... dangerous heresy, and an impious fraud. What is it that we have learned from this pretended thing called revealed religion? Nothing that is useful to man, and every thing that is dishonourable to his Maker. What is it the Bible teaches us?—repine, cruelty, and murder. What is it the Testament teaches us?—to believe that the Almighty committed debauchery with a woman engaged to be married; and the belief of this ...
— The Writings Of Thomas Paine, Complete - With Index to Volumes I - IV • Thomas Paine

... I will! My father's and your good instructions shall not be lost upon me, slave though I am. Dear father," said she, and the tears blinded her,—"I love his memory still, though every word of this hated will were true. I ought not to repine, whatever be my future lot. That he loved me as a daughter, I can never doubt; that he never told me I am a slave, I will forgive, for he ...
— Hatchie, the Guardian Slave; or, The Heiress of Bellevue • Warren T. Ashton

... Flaubert or Théodore de Banville? How far away they make the past seem! Poor Sainte-Beuve, that bust yonder is but a poor reward for a life of toil, a modest tribute to his encyclopædic brain! His works, however, are his best monument; he would be the last to repine or cavil. ...
— The Ways of Men • Eliot Gregory

... on, to wed another: No cause she gave me to repine; And when I heard you were a mother, I did not wish the children mine. My own young flock, in fair progression, Made up a pleasant Christmas row: My joy in them was past expression,— But that was ...
— Successful Recitations • Various

... is something significant of a spirit of fair play and discipline, not without its admirable quality, that under such circumstances, the weaker were not overpowered by the stronger, but that each man had an equal chance for life. The lot fell upon Owen Coffin,[1] the captain's nephew. He did not repine. He expressed his willingness to abide {242} by the decision. No man desired to be his executioner. They cast lots, as before, to determine who should kill him, and the lot fell upon Charles Ramsdale. By him ...
— South American Fights and Fighters - And Other Tales of Adventure • Cyrus Townsend Brady

... was one of the strongest and most well-balanced possible, yet it was capable of the tenderest and most compassionate feelings for the sorrows of others. He did not repine over the miseries and infirmities of human nature, he only desired that all souls should ...
— The Spirit of St. Francis de Sales • Jean Pierre Camus

... moral) is this: that when, in a mood of self-indulgence, we can write habitually with the gust, the licentious force, the flow, and the careless wealthy insolence of the Animadversions upon the Remonstrant's Defence against Smectymnuus, we need not then repine or be ill-content if we find that we can rise only occasionally to the chastity, the severity, and the ...
— Milton • Sir Walter Alexander Raleigh

... to repine; No stage is exempted from care: If you would true happiness find, Come follow! and I'll show you where. But, first, let us take for our guide The Word which Jehovah has penned; By this the true path is descried Which ...
— Cottage Poems • Patrick Bronte

... of eyes and ears, and with the light of the mind only to behold the light of truth. All the evils and impurities and necessities of men come from the body. And death separates him from these corruptions, which in life he cannot wholly lay aside. Why then should he repine when the hour of separation arrives? Why, if he is dead while he lives, should he fear that other death, through which alone he can behold wisdom in ...
— Phaedo - The Last Hours Of Socrates • Plato

... it is true, been deeply enough touched to feel either pique or melancholy at this discovery, but was so far heart-whole as to be rather inclined to laugh at the fickleness of the merry jilt, than either to repine or to ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol. XXXII No. 2. February 1848 • Various

... and fairness he was easily the leader in the community. Broad and strong, with a ruddy, good natured face, a fine tenor voice, a keen sense of humor and repartee, he was universally popular. No one had known Filmer to complain or repine, though there must have been moments when he longed for touch with those of his own caliber. His was the case of a big man who though bigger than his surroundings accepted them cheerfully. Thus, when Filmer looked up and saw the stranger standing at his office door ...
— The Rapids • Alan Sullivan

... as the pinions of the airy fry Of larks and linnets who traverse the sky, Is the Tartana, spun so very fine Its weight can never make the fair repine; Nor does it move beyond its proper sphere, But lets the gown in all its shape appear; Nor is the straightness of her waist denied To be by every ravished eye surveyed; For this the hoop may stand at largest bend, It comes not nigh, nor can its ...
— Royal Edinburgh - Her Saints, Kings, Prophets and Poets • Margaret Oliphant

... no fear, Philip," said she, "I rather like this wild adventurous change. We will go on shore and build our hut beneath the cocoa-trees, and I shall repine when the day comes which brings succour, and releases us from our desert isle. What do I ...
— The Phantom Ship • Captain Frederick Marryat

... tyrannise, landlords oppress, justice mercenary, lawyers vultures, physicians harpies, friends importunate, tradesmen liars, honest men thieves, devout assassins, great men to prostitute their wives, daughters, and themselves, middle sort to repine, commons to mutiny, all to grudge, murmur, and complain. A great temptation to all mischief, it compels some miserable wretches to counterfeit several diseases, to dismember, make themselves blind, lame, to have a more plausible cause to beg, and lose their limbs to recover their present ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... Repine not, my friend, at this unlooked-for reverse. Think upon the merits and misfortunes of your brother's friend; think upon his aged father, whom we shall enable him to rescue from poverty; think upon his desolate wife, whose ...
— Edgar Huntley • Charles Brockden Brown

... then should you be torn from the only one who has affection for you? But I shall see you to-night, and this is the hope that I shall live on through the day. Be happy, dear Shelley, and think of me! Why do I say this, dearest and only one? I know how tenderly you love me, and how you repine at your absence from me. When shall we be free from fear of treachery? I send you the letter I told you of from Harriet, and a letter we received yesterday from Fanny (this letter made an appointment for a meeting between Fanny and Clara); the history of this interview I will tell you when I come, ...
— Mrs. Shelley • Lucy M. Rossetti

... exacting satisfaction. May Goodchild was a typical daughter of her land. She had given her heart honestly and wholly to the man she loved; she found he had accepted it only to trifle with it and dishonour her. It was enough. There was no trait in her nature to lead her to repine; it was entirely controlled by a dominant desire to punish the traitor. Hal could scarcely believe that this stern, resolute woman was the same woe-begone inanimate girl he had interviewed. She examined the letter carefully, noting its date and post-mark, and putting ...
— Australia Revenged • Boomerang

... tragedy she has gone through. The double tragedy; for, soon after the master of Dandaloo's death in a Melbourne lunatic asylum, the little son of the house had died, not yet fourteen years of age, in an Inebriate's Home. Far was it from Mary to wish her friend to brood or repine; but to have ceased to remember as utterly as Agnes had done had something callous about it; and, in her own heart, Mary devoted a fresh regret to the memory of the poor little stepchild ...
— Australia Felix • Henry Handel Richardson

... his friends, to his wife, obliging, kind, And so averse from a revengeful mind, That had his men unsealed his bottled wine, He would not fret, nor doggedly repine. ...
— In Praise of Folly - Illustrated with Many Curious Cuts • Desiderius Erasmus

... am parted forever from him whom I have loved so devotedly; yet I cease to repine. I know my lot, and I will pass through life alone, yes, alone, without ...
— Inez - A Tale of the Alamo • Augusta J. Evans

... harmless deer repine, And think themselves unjustly slain By any other hand than thine, Whose arrows they would gladly stain; No, nor thy friends, which hold too dear That peace with France which keeps ...
— Poetical Works of Edmund Waller and Sir John Denham • Edmund Waller; John Denham

... dined with M. S——i, whose new 8vo edition of Buffon proceeds, I find, with becoming spirit. It is quite a journey to his residence; for he lives in one of the most retired quarters of Paris, However, I had no reason to repine at the distance, as the party was exceedingly cheerful. Naturalists and ...
— Paris As It Was and As It Is • Francis W. Blagdon

... the mare, "the cause of your sorrow. You should have left the golden crown alone, as I told you. But do not repine; go to the King and ask him for ...
— Legends & Romances of Brittany • Lewis Spence

... him to have them most thoroughly in hand and under control, were a set of disagreeable facts which had been driven well home to him. The results, being even such as we have seen, he did not much repine at, for he felt he had deserved them; and there was a sort of grim satisfaction, dreary as the prospect was, in facing them, and taking his punishment like a man. This was what he had felt at the first blush on the Hawk's Lynch; and, as he ...
— Tom Brown at Oxford • Thomas Hughes

... active occupation, in which all their beating energies may find employment. Subjection is the consequence of civilized life; and self-sacrifice is necessary in those who are born to toil, before they may partake of its enjoyments. But though the Young are conscious that this is so, they repine not the less; they feel that the freshness and verdure of life must first die away; that the promised recompense will probably come too late to the exhausted frame; that the blessings which would now be received with prostrate gratitude will cease to be felt ...
— The Bushman - Life in a New Country • Edward Wilson Landor

... hapless girl! had I known Thou hadst learnt to repine at thy lot; That splendour and rank were thy own, Thy home ...
— Poems • Matilda Betham

... many children parents don't repine, If they are handsome; in their judgment shine; Polite in carriage are, in body strong, Graceful in mien, and elegant in tongue. But if perchance an offspring prove but weak, Him they revile, laugh at, defraud and cheat. Such ...
— The Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault • Charles Perrault

... not repine in the absence of these things. She was happy in the performance of her duties, whether they were easy or not, and enjoyed the few simple pleasures that came in ...
— Christie Redfern's Troubles • Margaret Robertson

... John Grange quietly. "I have been two months in that place, and it has taught me patience. There, I am never going to repine." ...
— A Life's Eclipse • George Manville Fenn

... room for landscape, appoint you, Mr. Edgerton!—Ah! could I but know all. Could I be sure that she did love him! Could I be sure that she did not! That is the curse—that doubt!—Will it remain so? No! no! Once removed—once in those forest regions, it can not be that she will repine for anything. She MUST love me then—she will feel anew the first fond passion. She will forget these passing fancies. They WILL pass! She is young. The image will haunt her no longer—at least, it will no longer ...
— Confession • W. Gilmore Simms

... with life, but only to be informed that it is no better than a toy, and that he has wasted his time on a thing which has no practical value. A child (who represents the thoughtlessness of the great world) crushes the exquisite piece of workmanship in his little hand; but the watch-maker does not repine at this, for he realizes that after having achieved the beautiful, in his own spirit, the outward symbol of it has comparatively little value. The Artist of the Beautiful is Hawthorne himself; and in this exquisite ...
— The Life and Genius of Nathaniel Hawthorne • Frank Preston Stearns

... the Success of them to equal, if not surpass, that of the best of my own. An Author should take all Methods to humble himself in the Opinion he has of his own Performances. When these Papers appear to the World, I doubt not but they will be followed by many others; and I shall not repine, though I my self shall have left me but very few Days to appear in Publick: But preferring the general Weal and Advantage to any Consideration of my self, I am resolved for the Future to publish any 'Spectator' that deserves it, entire, and without any Alteration; assuring the World ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... weep, yet we joy at thy lot, Though we mourn thee, we yet can resign, Though we sorrow, 'tis not without hope, Though we lose thee, forbear to repine. ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 472 - Vol. XVII. No. 472., Saturday, January 22, 1831 • Various

... belief is unfounded is to change nothing of the realities of existence. The sun will descend as it passes the meridian whether we believe it to be noon or not. It is idle and foolish, if human, to repine because the truth is not precisely what we thought it, and at least we shall not change reality by ...
— A Reply to Dr. Lightfoot's Essays • Walter R. Cassels

... exercise of discipline, though it elicited outbursts of passion, seems to have had a healing effect. "Blessed be God," he writes, "who has certainly undertaken for me. His sharp rebuke has laid me low; yet why should I repine, since He has inclined me to seek His face again?" Upon his expulsion from the mission, he retired to a house he had built at "Pater Noster Valley," and after a few months left the country. His great services in reducing the Maori language to written ...
— A History of the English Church in New Zealand • Henry Thomas Purchas

... the confinement, and the earnest desire to be doing our part in the war, there could be no cause to repine at our lot. We were allowed, at our own expense, to supply our tables from the Boston market, not only abundantly, but luxuriously; the Government furnishing the usual rations; and the prisoners grew robust upon the good fare and the bracing climate. A tug plied daily between Boston ...
— The Narrative of a Blockade-Runner • John Wilkinson

... patiently I've waited To hear the answering tinkle on my bell; Have then the central offices belated Not switched me on as yet to thy hotel? Or is—oh, bitter thought!—a rival hated Addressing thee by telephone as well? Love, are you there? Distracted I repine; Oh, hear thy ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 104, April 1, 1893 • Various

... pleading example; and there is one of those very powers that on this occasion participated in the division which has all the seeds of discord in itself that brought on the ruin of the Polish empire. That power has already felt the effect of example; and, though it may repine, it cannot complain, as it might otherwise have done; or if it does, it cannot expect ...
— An Inquiry into the Permanent Causes of the Decline and Fall of Powerful and Wealthy Nations. • William Playfair

... who command above, High presidents of Heaven, By whom all things do move, As they have order given, What worldling can arise Against them to repine? Whilst castled in the skies With providence divine; They force this peopled round, Their judgments to confess, And in their wrath confound Proud mortals who transgress The bounds to them assigned ...
— A History of English Literature - Elizabethan Literature • George Saintsbury

... to's Brother so exceeding kind; When by it he doth such great hazard run, Losing at once his People and his Son. Grieve not, great Prince, at your unhappy Fate; } Let not your Birth your Vertue to abate; } It was not you that could your self create. } I should great folly shew, should I repine At what I could not help, and was no fault of mine. Tho by your Mothers side your Birth was mean, And tho your Mother no declared Queen, If Heaven and your Father please, you may By lawful Right, Judea's Scepter sway, After that he is number'd with the Dead, And his great Soul ...
— Anti-Achitophel (1682) - Three Verse Replies to Absalom and Achitophel by John Dryden • Elkanah Settle et al.

... a partial consolation in the company of Mr. Gifted Hopkins, who tried his new poems on her, which was the next best thing to addressing them to her. "Would that you were with us at this delightful season," she wrote in the autumn; "but no, your Susan must not repine. Yet, in the beautiful words of ...
— The Guardian Angel • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... be a man's toy and then his slave, with due allowance for food and clothes, suffices for them. But I had dreamed a dream that it would not suffice for you. Alas, alas! I stand alone now in the expression of my creed. You must excuse me if I repine, when I find myself so ...
— Kept in the Dark • Anthony Trollope

... pilgrim who journeys all day, To visit some far distant shrine; If he bear but a relic away, Is happy, nor heard to repine."— ...
— Account of a Tour in Normandy, Vol. II. (of 2) • Dawson Turner

... their little dark-eyed daughter Marian. Two years thereafter a baby boy had come and gone in a day; and, from that time, the mother had drooped and faded, day by day, until, at length, the end was close at hand. But "Cobbler" Horn was a Christian, and did not repine. ...
— The Golden Shoemaker - or 'Cobbler' Horn • J. W. Keyworth

... blood, nor traced the gradual ruin of my country. I should not have seen our towns involved in flames, nor our helpless children the captives of fell barbarians. But it is in vain for human beings to repine at the just decrees of Providence, which have consigned every people to misery and servitude that abandon virtue, and attach themselves to the ...
— The History of Sandford and Merton • Thomas Day

... submit to Destiny, cultivating, as the things necessary to virtue, knowledge, temperance, fortitude, justice. We must remember that every thing around us is in mutation; decay follows reproduction, and reproduction decay, and that it is useless to repine at death in a world where every thing is dying. As a cataract shows from year to year an invariable shape, though the water composing it is perpetually changing, so the aspect of Nature is nothing more than a flow of matter ...
— History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science • John William Draper

... sin. Sad its fate since I left, sadder 'twill be If they go on in sin as seen by me. Let us hope, ere too late, warned by the past, They may seek pleasures more likely to last, Or, like to Babylon, it must decline, And o'er its ruins its lovers repine. ...
— Masques & Phases • Robert Ross

... shocking occurrence, but the fate of Rushton was that to which every one of his friends was liable, and they did not sit down and repine over what could not be helped. The saddest thought connected with the matter was that one of the three must break the news to the invalid wife, who lived with her two children in one of the frontier settlements through which they passed on ...
— Camp-fire and Wigwam • Edward Sylvester Ellis

... her, to have given her pride and courage? But Maud is still almost a mystery to me. Who can tell how she suffers—I cannot—it seems to have quickened and enriched her love and tenderness; she seems to have a secret that I cannot come near to sharing; she does not repine, rebel, resist; she lives in some region of unapproachable patience and love. She goes daily to the grave, but I cannot visit it or think of it. The sight of the church-tower on my walks gives me a throb of dismay. But now we are going away. We have been lent a little house in a quiet seaside place; ...
— The Altar Fire • Arthur Christopher Benson

... calculates the growth of trees, has the unwelcome remembrance of the shortness of life driven hard upon him. He knows that he is doing what will never benefit himself; and when he rejoices to see the stem rise, is disposed to repine that another shall ...
— A Journey to the Western Isles of Scotland • Samuel Johnson

... fancy is active, and whose views are comprehensive; nor is any man satisfied with himself because he has done much, but because he can conceive little.' But to labour and be forgotten is the common lot; and why should a literary man be more disposed to repine because his productions perish after serving a temporary purpose, than the gardener or farmer, whose vocation it is to supply the people with their daily food? If the provisions furnished, whether for mind ...
— Leading Articles on Various Subjects • Hugh Miller

... his swoon revived. Naimes the Duke, and the count Aceline, Gefrei d'Anjou and his brother Tierry, Take up the King, bear him beneath a pine. There on the ground he sees his nephew lie. Most sweetly then begins he to repine: "Rollant, my friend, may God to thee be kind! Never beheld any man such a knight So to engage and so to end a fight. Now my honour is turned into decline!" Charle swoons again, he cannot stand ...
— The Song of Roland • Anonymous

... contentment Those eyes bereft me— And ah! how coldly Thou since hast left me: Yet didst thou whisper Thy heart was mine,— Oh! they were traitors Those eyes of thine! For 'tis thy pleasure That I repine. ...
— Barn and the Pyrenees - A Legendary Tour to the Country of Henri Quatre • Louisa Stuart Costello

... Look downward where an hundred realms appear; Lakes, forests, cities, plains extended wide, The pomp of kings, the shepherd's humbler pride. When thus creation's charms around combine, Amidst the store 'twere thankless to repine. 'Twere affectation all, and school-taught pride, To spurn the splendid things by heaven supply'd. Let school-taught pride dissemble all it can, These little things are great to little man; And wiser he, whose sympathetic mind Exults in all the good ...
— Early Reviews of English Poets • John Louis Haney

... what I mean? Ah, your look is a sign! I have made up my mind, and you need not repine. But yonder he comes who must lead me away— So I'll give the last kiss ...
— The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: - Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English, Volume 5. • Various

... thy sweet face; The way is dark, I can not trace. Thou doest best; I'll not repine, But say, "Thy will ...
— How to Live a Holy Life • C. E. Orr

... field of battle; who seeing the king lay about him desperately, exclaims to himself, "Lucky wight am I to be here instead of below, for certainly I should never escape from his blows." I also exerted my wit, and was much extolled when I said, that Sadik Khan and his troops ought not to repine after all; for although they were vanquished, yet still the king, in his magnanimity, had exalted their heads to the skies. In this, I alluded to a pillar of skulls which his majesty had caused to be erected of the heads of the vanquished. ...
— The Adventures of Hajji Baba of Ispahan • James Morier

... allayed any impatient feelings which might at times arise. I felt that I had great cause to be grateful to the Almighty for preserving me as he had done, and that it would be folly and wickedness on my part to repine because I could not obtain all that I wished. I waited, therefore, for His own good time, without murmuring, and in full confidence that all was ...
— The Privateer's-Man - One hundred Years Ago • Frederick Marryat

... sarcastically, taking the words from Enfield, "we have been visited with that fell calamity, the collapse of Mr. Croker and his rule. We have seen the black last of him, and the very name of Croker already begins to be a memory. But why should one repine?" Lemon's sneer was deepening. "In every age the other great have come and ruled and gone to that oblivion beyond. They arose to fall and be forgot. It is the law. Then why not Mr. Croker? True, even while we consent, there comes that natural sadness which I now observe to sparkle so brightly in ...
— The Onlooker, Volume 1, Part 2 • Various

... lot; but far unlike is mine: Forbid to eat, not daring to repine. 'Twas heaven's command; and should we disobey, What raised thy being, ours must ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Volume 5 (of 18) - Amboyna; The state of Innocence; Aureng-Zebe; All for Love • John Dryden

... Lovers no longer repine, But their Hearts and their Voices advance; Let the Nymphs and the Swains in the kind Chorus join, And the Satyrs and Fauns in a Dance. Let Nature put on her Beauty of May, And the Fields and the Meadows adorn; Let the Woods and ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn, Vol. III • Aphra Behn

... was enjoying it; the demands of a system required his father and Lord Crosland to spend most of their day in the darker, though hardly cooler air of the Temple of Fortune. But the system went well, and they did not repine. ...
— The Admirable Tinker - Child of the World • Edgar Jepson

... justice, what place will contain me all these women and slaves?" Quoth the King, "O weak o wit, I bade not my nobles deal thus with thee but that we might gather together unto thee wealth galore; for may be thou wilt bethink thee of thy country and family and repine for them and be minded to return to thy mother-land; so shalt thou take from our country muchel of money to maintain thyself withal, what while thou livest in thine own country." And quoth Abu Sir, "O King of the age, (Allah advance thee!) these white slaves ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 9 • Richard F. Burton

... have I to weep over a treasure which is as far from me as heaven is from earth?" said she. "I will not repine, so long as I am free to dream of him without crime. But what if I should lose that freedom? What if my father should wish to force me into marriage? Oh, then, I should take refuge behind the friendly portals of ...
— Joseph II. and His Court • L. Muhlbach

... terrible at this moment. I endeavour to strengthen my mind by arguing against the possibility of such a calamity. Alas! how soon have sorrows and friars, real as well as severe, followed the uniform and tranquil state of existence at which so lately I was disposed to repine! But I will not oppress you any longer with my complaints. Adieu, ...
— Guy Mannering • Sir Walter Scott

... in palpable puns. We will call parties named King "your Majesty" and we will say to the Smiths that we think we have heard that name before somewhere. Such is human nature. We cannot alter this. It is God that made us so for some good and wise purpose. Let us not repine. But though I may seem strange, may seem eccentric, I mean to refrain from punning upon the name of this club, though I could make a very good one if I had time to ...
— Mark Twain, A Biography, 1835-1910, Complete - The Personal And Literary Life Of Samuel Langhorne Clemens • Albert Bigelow Paine

... fallacious qualities which flash upon the public and excite loud but transient applause. His works were more read than cited; and the charm of style, for which he was especially noted, was more apt to be felt than talked about. He used often to repine, in a half-humorous, half-querulous manner, at his tardiness in gaining the laurels which he felt to be his due. "The public," he would exclaim, "will never do me justice; whenever I write anything they make a point to know ...
— Oliver Goldsmith • Washington Irving

... content. Weave Thou my life until the web is spun; Chide me, O Father, till Thy will be done: Thy child no longer murmurs to obey; He only sorrows o'er the past delay. Lost is my realm; yet I shall not repine, If, after all, I ...
— A Forgotten Hero - Not for Him • Emily Sarah Holt

... notwithstanding, deeply and bitterly upon the subject: and knew that she was the victim of a most diabolical plot; but she did not permit this to interfere with her daily avocations, or induce her to sit down in apathetic sorrow, and repine over a fate that no effort of hers could influence in any ...
— Ridgeway - An Historical Romance of the Fenian Invasion of Canada • Scian Dubh

... refresh itself, the weary soul makes an effort to recall the last part of the vision, its soaring flight through a stormy nocturnal sky to meet descending angels. And he reflects dimly: "If this fate awaits me, why should I repine? Though I be tempted I shall not be conquered, and though I be conquered still God will raise me up again. Neither is it necessary to ask what His will is concerning me. Why not go down, ...
— The Saint • Antonio Fogazzaro

... incurred the censure of the British Conference for supporting, and not for opposing, the government when it needed my support, and when it was in my power to have embarrassed it.... As it respects myself personally, I shall not repine at having made the sacrifice, if the new system of government but succeeds, and the land of my birth and affections is made prosperous and happy. Note ...
— The Story of My Life - Being Reminiscences of Sixty Years' Public Service in Canada • Egerton Ryerson

... days of life were ours; The worst can be but mine; The sun that cheers, the storm that lowers, Shall never more be thine. The silence of that dreamless sleep I envy now too much to weep; Nor need I to repine That all those charms have passed away, I might have watched through ...
— Studies in Literature and History • Sir Alfred Comyn Lyall

... than maist o' them. Eh, sirs!—an' are ye still a mason?" "No; I have not wrought as a mason for the last fourteen years; but I have to work hard enough for all that." "Weel, weel, it's our appointed lot; an' if we have but health an' strength, an' the wark to do, why should we repine?" Once fairly entered on our talk together, we gossipped on till the night fell, giving and receiving information regarding our old acquaintances of a quarter of a century before; of whom we found that no inconsiderable proportion ...
— The Cruise of the Betsey • Hugh Miller

... delights of a crowded city on the continent. In the one all nature is free, whilst the debauchee frowns on her laughing landscapes; in the other, conscience and her busy devils are at work—yet thousands thus embitter life's cup, and then repine at their uncheery lot. With such men, all must be Clouds—a winter of discontent—for who ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 13 Issue 367 - 25 Apr 1829 • Various

... clear and competent estate, That I might live genteelly, but not great: As much as I could moderately spend; A little more, sometimes t' oblige a friend. Nor should the sons of poverty repine At fortune's frown, for they should taste of mine; And all that objects of true pity were, Should be relieved with what my wants could spare; For what our Maker has too largely given, Should be returned in gratitude to ...
— English Poets of the Eighteenth Century • Selected and Edited with an Introduction by Ernest Bernbaum

... are, And when they speak they seem to sing; Beyond her sex she was not wise; And there is no more common thing Than kindness in a woman's eyes. Then wherefore weep so long and fast, Why so exceedingly repine! Say, how has thy Beloved surpass'd So much all others?' 'She ...
— The Angel in the House • Coventry Patmore

... be; spirits and viands fine My humble means will not afford. But what we have, we'll taste and not repine; From us will come no grumbling word. And though to you no virtue I can add, Yet we will sing and dance, ...
— Chinese Literature • Anonymous

... mingle the sweet word ye call in vain With that ye pour! And bring to me her wreath of yesterday That's dank with myrrh; Hesternae Rosae, ah my friends, but they Remember her! Lo the kind roses, loved of lovers, weep As who repine, For if on any breast they see her sleep It ...
— Grass of Parnassus • Andrew Lang



Words linked to "Repine" :   quetch, kick, kvetch, complain, sound off, plain



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