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Ding   /dɪŋ/   Listen
Ding

noun
1.
A ringing sound.
2.
An impression in a surface (as made by a blow).  Synonyms: dent, gouge, nick.



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"Ding" Quotes from Famous Books



... like a child's, so impressionable, so innocent, so sad: he was now all within, as before he was all without; hence his brooding look. As the snow blattered in his face, he muttered, "How it raves and drifts! On-ding o' snaw,—ay, that's the word,—on-ding—" He was now at his own door, "Castle Street, No.39." He opened the door, and went straight to his den; that wondrous workshop, where, in one year, 1823, when he was fifty-two, ...
— Stories of Childhood • Various

... hove in sight presently—the very boy, of all boys, whose ridicule he had been dreading. Ben's gait was the hop-skip-and-jump—proof enough that his heart was light and his anticipations high. He was eating an apple, and giving a long, melodious whoop, at intervals, followed by a deep-toned ding-dong-dong, ding-dong-dong, for he was personating a steamboat. As he drew near, he slackened speed, took the middle of the street, leaned far over to starboard and rounded to ponderously and with laborious pomp and circumstance—for he was personating ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... the hills sloped upward under oaken saplings as yet too young for the stripping; the valley stretched winding landward beneath Sancreed. Above and far away stretched the Cornish moors dotted with man's mining enterprises, chiefly deserted. Ding-Dong raised its gaunt engine stack and, distant though it was, Joan's sharp eyes could see the rusty arm of iron stretching forth from the brickwork, motionless, not worth the removing. Close at hand, where the stream wandered babbling at her feet, the ...
— Lying Prophets • Eden Phillpotts

... aith upo' 't, Ma'colm," she said when she returned, "she means naething but ill by that puir cratur; but you and me— we'll ding (defeat) her yet, gien't be his wull. She wants a grip o' 'm for some ill rizzon or ither—to lock him up in a madhoose, maybe, as the villains said, or 'deed, maybe, to mak ...
— Malcolm • George MacDonald

... small tuft of hair. There were wrinkles in "the angel's forehead." If meddlesome Time had also furrowed his cheeks, nevertheless the most conspicuous mark there was still the scar of that great gash received in the ding-dong fight at Berbera. His hair, which should have been grizzled, he kept dark, Oriental fashion, with dye, and brushed forward. Another curious habit was that of altering his appearance. In the course of a few months he would have long hair, short hair, big moustache, small moustache, long ...
— The Life of Sir Richard Burton • Thomas Wright

... the good preacher—no matter where; but his wishes availed nought, for he remained close to his side, holding forth, without intermission, in the same monotonous tone, that sounded like the ding-dong, ding-dong of a curfew-bell to ...
— The Buccaneer - A Tale • Mrs. S. C. Hall

... and their fledglings. We flew over farms where there were Doves like you; over rivers where the Wild Ducks were feeding by the shore; and over towns where crowds of boys and girls were going into large buildings, while on top of these buildings were large bells singing, 'Ding ...
— Among the Farmyard People • Clara Dillingham Pierson

... of dat in Teutchland—in mine coontry. It ist not ferry easy to explain it in a few vords, but der brincipal ding ist dat der vassal owes a serfice to hist lort. In de olten dimes dis serfice vast military, und dere ist someding of dat now. It ist de noples who owe der feudal serfice, brincipally, in mine coontry, and dey owes it to ...
— The Redskins; or, Indian and Injin, Volume 1. - Being the Conclusion of the Littlepage Manuscripts • James Fenimore Cooper

... father lies: Of his bones are coral made; Those are pearls that were his eyes: Nothing of him that doth fade, But doth suffer a sea-change Into something rich and strange. Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell: Hark! now I hear them,—Ding-dong, bell." ...
— Tales from Shakespeare • Charles Lamb and Mary Lamb

... the little robin had shouted, "Ding-a-ling! ding-a-ling!" for hardly had they reached the top of the hill when the school bell commenced: "Ding, dong! ding, ...
— Little Jack Rabbit and the Squirrel Brothers • David Cory

... in his bonds to stare upon Beltane, "forsooth, Roger, he took a dour ding upon his yellow pate, look ye; but for his mail-coif he were a dead ...
— Beltane The Smith • Jeffery Farnol

... rule in dis house dat nobody can use huh chiny or fo'ks or spoons who ain't boa'ding heah, and de odder day when yuh asked me to bring up a knife and fo'k she ketched me coming upstairs, and she says, 'Where yuh goin' wid all dose things, Annie?' Ah said, 'Ah'm just goin' up to Miss Laura's room ...
— The Easiest Way - A Story of Metropolitan Life • Eugene Walter and Arthur Hornblow

... sound of bells broke the stillness ling, lang, ding dong. These were the foxgloves, and the balsams popped like tiny pistols, and from the tall mosses came sudden explosions and the scattering of illuminated spores. All this in honour of ...
— Fairy Tales from the German Forests • Margaret Arndt

... ding, swing, cling, sing, wring, sting, the tingling of the termination ng, and the sharpness of the vowel i, imply the continuation of a very slender motion or tremor, at length indeed vanishing, but not suddenly interrupted. But in tink, wink, sink, ...
— A Grammar of the English Tongue • Samuel Johnson

... get hame, my sweet Jessie, For fear some young laird o' degree May come roun' on his fine sleekit bawsy, An' ding a' my prospects agee. There 's naething like gowd to the miser, There 's naething like light to the e'e, But they canna gie me ony pleasure, If Jessie ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume II. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... Ding, dong, bell, Pussy-cat's in the well. Who put her in? Little Johnny Green. Who pull'd her out? Little Johnny Stout. What a naughty boy was that, To drown his poor grand-mammy's cat; Which never did him any harm, But killed the ...
— Traditional Nursery Songs of England - With Pictures by Eminent Modern Artists • Various

... gone: A crimson night-gown he put on: I saw him cover up his head: Ding dong, He's ...
— Chatterbox, 1905. • Various

... homeward bound. If she went downtown now, she saw only those Saturday-night family groups which are familiar to every small town. The husband, very damp as to hair and clean as to shirt, guarding the gocart outside while the woman accomplished her Saturday-night trading at Ding's or Halpin's. Sometimes there were as many as half a dozen gocarts outside Halpin's, each containing a sleeping burden, relaxed, chubby, fat-cheeked. The waiting men smoked their pipes and conversed largely. ...
— One Basket • Edna Ferber

... bones were broken, and the load was replaced. But we were off the road, and a search was begun with lights to find the beaten path. Footsore and hungry, with an almost intolerable thirst, we trudged along till morning, to the ding-dong, ding-dong of the deep-toned camel-bells. Finally we reached a sluggish river, but did not dare to satisfy our thirst, except by washing out our mouths, and by taking occasional swallows, with long intervals of rest, in one of which we fell asleep from sheer exhaustion. When ...
— Across Asia on a Bicycle • Thomas Gaskell Allen and William Lewis Sachtleben

... he said meditatively, "I've just remembered that, when I was at school, I used to sing a thing called the what's-it's-name's wedding song. At house-suppers, don't you know, and what not. Jolly little thing. I daresay you know it. It starts 'Ding dong! Ding dong!' or words to that effect, 'Hurry along! For it is my wedding-morning!' I remember you had to stretch out the 'mor' a bit. Deuced awkward, if you hadn't laid in enough breath. 'The Yeoman's Wedding-Song.' That was it. I knew ...
— A Damsel in Distress • Pelham Grenville Wodehouse

... ribbon, up to the trembling tops of the tall poplar trees fringing the river banks,—the warm radiance palpitated with a thousand ethereal hues of soft and changeful colour, transfusing all visible things into the misty semblance of some divine dwelling of dreams. Ding-dong—ding dong! The last echo of the last bell died away upon the air—the last words enunciated by devout priests in their cloistered seclusion were said—"In hora mortis nostrae! Amen!"—the market women went on their slow way homeward,—the children scampered off in different ...
— The Master-Christian • Marie Corelli

... would call das Ding an sich. Everything we see and know is but appearance. The underlying substance, "that ...
— The Sceptics of the Old Testament: Job - Koheleth - Agur • Emile Joseph Dillon

... a ding-dong frae mornin' till nicht aboot ma face, and a'm fair deaved (deafened), so a'm watchin' for MacLure tae get a bottle as he ...
— Beside the Bonnie Brier Bush • Ian Maclaren

... sense, the following are examples: We do not frequently speak of the wind "standing" in a certain direction; we do not often "advance" our sails nor "prove" our chance; "vaward" and "bilboes" are old words; "ding" in the sense used here has long been forgotten; of "archery" except as a sport we know nothing; "Spanish yew" is no longer valuable for bows, and few can tell how long a "clothyard" (the English ell, 45 inches long) ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 10 - The Guide • Charles Herbert Sylvester

... Ding! The old door-bell sounded. Beth drooped her head, but the bell had attracted her father's attention, and Aunt Prudence thrust her head into the ...
— Beth Woodburn • Maud Petitt

... published before his release, or at latest immediately after it. The earliest with which Mr. Major has been able to supply me, either by means of his own diligent inquiries, or the kindness of his friends, is that "eighth e-di-ti-on" so humorously introduced by Gay, and printed—not for Ni-cho-las Bod-ding-ton, but for Nathanael Ponder, at the Peacock in the Poultrey, near the Church, 1682; for whom also the ninth was published in 1684, and the tenth in 1685. All these no ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. XVII. No. 469. Saturday January 1, 1831 • Various

... Hougoumont and St. John. And about forty-five years since, I rang all through one Sunday in June, when there was such a battle going on in the corn-fields there, as none of you others ever heard tolled of. Yes, from morning service until after vespers, the French and English were all at it, ding-dong." And then calls of business intervening, the bells have to give up their private jangle, resume their professional duty, and sing their hourly chorus out ...
— Roundabout Papers • William Makepeace Thackeray

... our noble king, His broadsword brandishing, Down the French host did ding,[11] As to o'erwhelm it; And many a deep wound lent, His arms with blood besprent, And many a cruel ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 5 • Charles Sylvester

... the papers call a ding-dong struggle. Suffice it to say that at the twelfth I was dormy one and in a ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Dec. 12, 1917 • Various

... overlap at the saddle-flap, and yet be loo'd on the tape: And it all depends upon changing ends, how a seven-year-old will shape; It was tack and tack to the Lepe and back—a fair ding-dong to the Ridge, And he led by his forward canvas yet as we shot ...
— From a Cornish Window - A New Edition • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... ding thing for me, Mr. Man,' I ups an' tells him. 'Hain't got nairy business with pikers like you-all. I don't git to Chicago often, but when I do I plays with nothin' but blue chips, an' ...
— The Boy Scouts Book of Stories • Various

... jes from college, an' she's all right now, I tell yer. You know dem Simses is top er de pot Niggers." "That's the kind I always play for, Calvin; you know me," answered Ben. "Gentlemen must always have the best, ding it all! I though you were sufficiently well bred to know that the best of everything in this world is for white people." "Dat's so," said Sauls, "but yo member dat time Bob Sims cum nie beat'n ...
— Hanover; Or The Persecution of the Lowly - A Story of the Wilmington Massacre. • David Bryant Fulton

... Dresden!" says Mr. Musgrave, throwing back his head and looking up at the pale blue sultriness above our heads—the waveless, stormless ether sea—as we pace along, with the church-bells' measured ding-dong in our ears, and the cool ripe grasses ...
— Nancy - A Novel • Rhoda Broughton

... starting tear For the hours are surely fleeting And the sad sundown is near. All must sip the cup of sorrow, I to-day, and thou to-morrow! This the end of every song, Ding-dong! Ding-dong! Yet until the shadows fall Over one and over all, Sing a ...
— The Common Law • Robert W. Chambers

... limped, still and ever lame with rheumatism, towards the third member of the procession. "Gin I had the loon that did it," she went on, fumbling, with a haste that defeated itself, at the knot that bound Hawkie's nose to the tail of the cadger's horse—"gin I had the loon 'at did it, I wad ding the sowl oot o' ...
— Alec Forbes of Howglen • George MacDonald

... bells solemnly, Ding dong deep: My friend is passing to his bed, Fast asleep; There's plaited linen round his head, 20 While foremost go his feet— His feet that cannot carry him. My feast's a show, my lights are dim; Be still, your music is not sweet,— There is no music more ...
— Goblin Market, The Prince's Progress, and Other Poems • Christina Rossetti

... and nigh that her prophetic ear could, in fancy, catch the noise of it, hear the murmur of the villagers as she came out of church, imagine the jangle of the three thin-toned Hintock bells. The dialogues seemed to grow louder, and the ding-ding-dong of those three crazed bells more persistent. She awoke: ...
— The Woodlanders • Thomas Hardy

... purpose that to me came Miss Sterling last. Afterward, when I so state privately to her, she smile all about and say, "It is most fortunate that your envelope contains the B, Bing Ding, for being a Eurasion, you can write the English more fluently than the others." But that is of Biography unimportant, so I ...
— Seven Maids of Far Cathay • Bing Ding, Ed.

... some people hold! Two young fellows quarrel— Then they fight, for both are bold— Rage of both is uncontrolled— Both are stretched out, stark and cold! Prithee, where's the moral? Ding dong! Ding dong! There's an end to further action, And this barbarous transaction Is described as "satisfaction"! Ha! ha! ha! ha! satisfaction! Ding dong! Ding dong! Each is laid in churchyard mould— Strange the views ...
— The Complete Plays of Gilbert and Sullivan - The 14 Gilbert And Sullivan Plays • William Schwenk Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan

... "Well I'll be ding-swizzled and everlastingly flabbergasted. Lit out to get married an' never said a word to nobody. Pulls out o' town, dressed in her best suit o' clothes, like old man McGinty, an' heads north. Uh-huh! Bob McGraw's at the bottom ...
— The Long Chance • Peter B. Kyne

... sir, it is balderdash, there's nae doubt o't. It is the crownhead o' absurdity to tak in the havers o' auld wives for gospel. I told them that my master was a peeous man, an' a sensible man; an', for praying, that he could ding auld Macmillan himsel. 'Sae could the deil,' they said, 'when he liket, either at preaching or praying, if these war to answer his ain ends.' 'Na, na,' says I, 'but he's a strick believer in a' the truths o' Christianity, ...
— The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner • James Hogg

... he exclaimed. "These here ding-busted long socks o' yourn air so all-fired tight the blamed drawers hez hiked up in ridges all round! Makes me look like a bunch o' bananas in a ...
— The Panchronicon • Harold Steele Mackaye

... pines on the lower parts of the ridge standing out, in fine relief. To the N. was a noble peak bare at its summit, on which snow rests during some months, its centre being prettily marked out with numerous patches of cultivation. To the N. again the Tid-ding might be seen foaming along the valleys; the hills are evidently improving in height and magnificence of scenery. We reached this at 12 o'clock, our march having lasted five hours. We thence descended crossing a small stream at the base of the ...
— Journals of Travels in Assam, Burma, Bhootan, Afghanistan and The - Neighbouring Countries • William Griffith

... ding! ding! Strike! ding! ding! The iron glows, And loveth good blows As fire doth bellows. ...
— The Broad Highway • Jeffery Farnol

... family niggers free, but a chunk of money came to my children—fifty thousand dollars. It stood in their name, but I got their legal consent to handle it. Mostyn knew I had it and was constantly ding-donging at me about his mill idea. Well, I went in—I risked the whole amount. He was made president although he didn't hold ten thousand dollars' worth of stock. Then I reckon you know what happened. He run ...
— The Desired Woman • Will N. Harben

... Bengan: Pers. Bdingn or Badiljn; the Mala insana (Solanum pomiferum or S. Melongena) of the Romans, well known in Southern Europe. It is of two kinds, the red (Solanum lycopersicum) and the black (S. Melongena). The Spaniards know it ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... side. Tail down, and everybody is tryin' to kick you. If it wa'n't for that streak in human nature them devilish trusts that I've heard tell of couldn't live a minit." He saw men standing afar and staring at him apprehensively. "That's right, ding baste ye," he said, musingly, "look up to me and keep your distance! It don't make no gre't diff'runce how it's done, so long as I can ...
— The Skipper and the Skipped - Being the Shore Log of Cap'n Aaron Sproul • Holman Day

... of the venal rabble of spirits or deities, and to sacrifice to Him, as to them. And this is exactly what happened! If we are not to call it 'degeneration,' what are we to call it? It may be an old theory, but facts 'winna ding,' and are on the side of an old theory. Meanwhile, on the material plane, culture kept advancing, the crafts and arts arose; departments arose, each needing a god; thought grew clearer; such admirable ethics as those of the Aztecs were developed, and while bleeding human hearts smoked on ...
— The Making of Religion • Andrew Lang

... a little hammer on a copper pot; and the reason he is always making it is because he is the town crier to every Indian garden, and tells all the news to everybody who cares to listen. As Rikki-tikki went up the path, he heard his "attention" notes like a tiny dinner gong, and then the steady "Ding-dong-tock! Nag is dead—dong! Nagaina is dead! Ding-dong-tock!" That set all the birds in the garden singing, and the frogs croaking, for Nag and Nagaina used to eat frogs as well as ...
— The Jungle Book • Rudyard Kipling

... pleasure walk for the benefit of their health, and the poukit hens, that dangled before them, ornaments of their bravery. The whole crowd, young and old, followed them from one end of the town to the other, liking to ding one another over, so anxious were they to get a sight of what was going on; but when they came to the gate-end, they stopped and gave the ne'er-do-weels three cheers. What think you did the ne'er-do-weels do in return? Fie shame! they took off their old scrapers and gave a huzza too; clapping ...
— The Life of Mansie Wauch - tailor in Dalkeith • D. M. Moir

... when we see the mistletoe-bough in the White Parlour. It's true, most things are gone back'ard in these last thirty years—the country's going down since the old king fell ill. But when I look at Miss Nancy here, I begin to think the lasses keep up their quality;—ding me if I remember a sample to match her, not when I was a fine young fellow, and thought a deal about my pigtail. No offence to you, madam," he added, bending to Mrs. Crackenthorp, who sat by him, "I didn't know you when you were as young as ...
— Silas Marner - The Weaver of Raveloe • George Eliot

... men being like towers. Both these sentences puzzled the boy; and yet Taffy never felt so near to understanding him as he had then, and did again now. He was shy of his father. He did not know that his father was just as shy of him. He began to ring with all his soul—ding—ding-ding, ding-ding. ...
— The Ship of Stars • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... they willingly tolerated their silent patriotism. Only little Baron Wilhelm would have liked to have forced them to ring the bells. He was very angry at his superior's politic compliance with the priest's scruples, and every day he begged the commandant to allow him to sound "ding-dong, ding-dong," just once, only just once, just by way of a joke. And he asked it like a wheedling woman, in the tender voice of some mistress who wishes to obtain something, but the commandant would not yield, ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume II (of 8) • Guy de Maupassant

... shout the breezes To the tree-tops waving high, "Don't you hear the happy tidings Whispered to the earth and sky? Have you caught them in your dreaming, Brook and rill in snowy dells? Do you know the joy we bring you In the merry Christmas bells? Ding, dong! ding, ...
— The Nursery, No. 169, January, 1881, Vol. XXIX - A Monthly Magazine for Youngest Readers • Various

... and Company sat huddled at their desks in the Modern class-room, biting their pens, groaning over their sums, and gazing dismally from the window all at the same time, they had the unspeakable anguish of beholding Wally, D'Arcy, Ashby, and Fisher minor, with their ball, having a ding-dong game of punt-about on the sacred Modern grass, under their ...
— The Cock-House at Fellsgarth • Talbot Baines Reed

... an eft Or worm among them, and as for theft, How the old woman keeps them I cannot say, But they're finer than any grown this way." Jeanne Tourmont drew back the filigree ring Of her striped silk purse, tipped it upside down And shook it, two coins fell with a ding Of striking silver, beneath her gown One rolled, the other lay, a thing Sparked white and sharply glistening, In a drop of sunlight between two shades. She jerked the purse, took its empty ends And crumpled ...
— Men, Women and Ghosts • Amy Lowell

... Ding, dong, bell, Pussy's in the well! Who put her in? Little Tommy Lin: Who pulled her out? Little Tommy Stout. What a naughty boy was that, Who tried to drown poor pussy cat, That never did him any harm, But killed the mice in his ...
— Simple Simon - Silhouette Series • Anonymous

... and of boldness I bear evermore the bell; Of main and of might I master every man; I ding with my doughtiness the Devil down to Hell; For both of Heaven and of Earth ...
— Shakespeare: His Life, Art, And Characters, Volume I. • H. N. Hudson

... pretty good," he said. "You ought to hev seen them folks when he rode out of the wood. Flabbergasted ain't the word. They was ding-busted." ...
— Tish, The Chronicle of Her Escapades and Excursions • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... Heigh ding a ding, what shall I sing? How many holes in a skimmer? Four and twenty. I'm half starving! Mother, pray give me ...
— The Only True Mother Goose Melodies - Without Addition or Abridgement • Munroe and Francis

... next township they would tell where they were bound, and more would join. Passing by boundary riders' and prospectors' huts, they would pick up here and there another red-blood who could not resist the chance of being in a real ding-dong fight. Many were grizzled and gray, but as hard as nails, and no one could prove that they were over the age for enlistment, for they themselves did not know how old ...
— "Over There" with the Australians • R. Hugh Knyvett

... every soul of them the twelve tunes of his musical-box. It was pleasant to see him with that musical-box—how pleased he wound it up after dinner—how happily he listened to the little clinking tunes as they galloped, ding-dong, after each other! A man who carries a musical-box is always ...
— Notes on a Journey from Cornhill to Grand Cairo • William Makepeace Thackeray

... king, His broad sword brandishing, Down the French host did ding, As to o'erwhelm it; And many a deep wound lent, His arms with blood besprent, And many a cruel dent ...
— English Songs and Ballads • Various

... were growing pretty thick about us. I was inclined to be pretty glad when it was over, for though I was as hard as nails at that time, being fresh as I was from the severe training of the campaign, I was walked almost off my legs. The talk went on ding-dong all the time, and in the course of it my host asked me with what weapons the Zaptiehs—the mounted police who were relied on to keep order—and the irregulars who were committing unchecked atrocities ...
— Recollections • David Christie Murray

... of the Wagner concert in Pest I should like my "Bells" to ring, and beg Abranyi to attune the Hungarian Klingklang [ding-dong] of them ...
— Letters of Franz Liszt, Volume 2: "From Rome to the End" • Franz Liszt; letters collected by La Mara and translated

... creature ain't a fraud." And then one night in the waning light, as I hurried home to sup, I hears a roar by the cabin door, and a great white hulk heaves up. So my rifle flashed, and a bullet crashed; dead, dead as a stone fell he, And I gave a cheer, for there in his ear—Gosh ding me!—a tiny flea. ...
— Ballads of a Bohemian • Robert W. Service

... Schoepfer aller Ding, Wie bist du worden so gering, Dass du da liegst auf duerrem Gras, Davon ...
— Christmas in Ritual and Tradition, Christian and Pagan • Clement A. Miles

... out of the window, and nothing in the house wears a cheerful aspect. Mother has a headache; when I proposed reading to her, she very politely asked me if I would not let her remain alone. She says I always want to sing, read, or talk incessantly if she wishes to be quiet. I can't ding on the piano, for it is heard from attic to basement. I don't want to read alone, for I have such a desire to be sociable—now, Aunt Mary, you have a catalogue of my troubles, can't you relieve me, for I am really miserable, if I don't look so!" Alice broke ...
— Words of Cheer for the Tempted, the Toiling, and the Sorrowing • T. S. Arthur

... mine own sweetheart, From thee I'll never depart; Thou art my Ciperlillie, And I thy Trangdidowne-dilly: And sing, Hey ding a ding ding, And do the tother thing: And when 'tis done, not miss To give my wench a kiss: And then dance, Canst thou not hit it? Ho, brave ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. IX • Various

... skies His hands have built, where holy fires To Samas burn; its flame ne'er dies, To holiness lead man's desires. He opens wide the fiery gates Of all the gods at Dintir old, Ka-ding-ir-a.[4] This day completes His grandeur—may it far be told Of our great Sar whose godly gate Wide opens Heaven's joy for man, Of Iz-zu-bar-ili the great, Who rules from Khar-sak to the main. Within the entrance to the royal rooms, Queen Ishtar with her train in splendor comes, ...
— Babylonian and Assyrian Literature • Anonymous

... you," hissed Smith; "it's an ambulance for yours and ding- dong to the funny-house! What are you trying to do now?" With real misgiving, for Brown, balanced on the edge of the gutter, began waving his arms in a birdlike way as though about to launch himself into ...
— The Green Mouse • Robert W. Chambers

... a screaming iron and three consummate approaches would make me square again. Occasionally he would, by superhuman play, do a hole in bogey; but only to crack at the next, and leave me, at the edge of the green, to play "one off eleven." It was, in fact, a ding-dong struggle all the way; and for his one-hole victory in the morning I had my revenge with a one-hole victory in ...
— The Sunny Side • A. A. Milne

... from the abbey to the paroche kirk; and be the said Richart and another servant lifted upe to the pulpit, whar he behovit to lean at his first entrie; bot or he haid done with his sermont he was sa active and vigorus that he was lyk to ding that pulpit in blads, and fly out ...
— The Scottish Reformation - Its Epochs, Episodes, Leaders, and Distinctive Characteristics • Alexander F. Mitchell

... gun at the citadel which called forth these exclamations, soon followed by the ding-dong of the ...
— The Free Lances - A Romance of the Mexican Valley • Mayne Reid

... monotonous, harping, iterative, recursive [Math, Comp], unvaried; mocking, chiming; retold; aforesaid, aforenamed[obs3]; above-mentioned, above-said; habitual &c. 613; another. Adv. repeatedly, often, again, anew, over again, afresh, once more; ding-dong, ditto, encore, de novo, bis[obs3], da capo[It]. again and again; over and over, over and over again; recursively [Comp]; many times over; time and again, time after time; year after year; day by day &c.; many times, ...
— Roget's Thesaurus

... sir, God bless your honour! I hope ye'll ding Johnnie Howie yet, and that I'll live to see it." And so saying, the old beggar moved off, relieving Mr. Oldbuck of recollections which were ...
— The Antiquary, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... may be the 'noumenon' or actuality, 'das Ding in sich', of Christ's humanity, as well as the 'Ding in sich' of which the ...
— The Literary Remains Of Samuel Taylor Coleridge • Edited By Henry Nelson Coleridge

... might have been ten times, twenty times, as happy if we'd only kept on steady ding-dong work, like George Storefield, having patience and seeing ourselves get better off—even a little—year by year. What had he come to? And what lay before us? And though we were that fond of poor mother ...
— Robbery Under Arms • Thomas Alexander Browne, AKA Rolf Boldrewood

... answered the German. "Es it ein ganz einfaches Ding," and he began to explain the construction of ...
— Anna Karenina • Leo Tolstoy

... solely on her account—so that she might not be left alone. If she could go to her and tell her that she herself was about to marry Trenby, then the only obstacle which stood in the way of Penelope's happiness would be removed. Last night her thoughts had swung from side to side in a ceaseless ding-dong struggle of indecision, but this new factor in the matter weighted the scales heavily in favour ...
— The Moon out of Reach • Margaret Pedler

... und m[i]n golt, ich mache iuch mir als[o] holt da[z] ir mich harte gerne ernert.' 'mir w[ae]r[e.] der wille unrewert' sprach der meister aber d[o]: 215 'und w[ae]r[e.] der arzen[i]e als[o] da[z] man s[i] veile funde oder da[z] man s[i] kunde mit deheinen ding[e.]n erwerben, ich enlie[z]e iuch niht verderben. 220 nu enmac des leider niht s[i]n: d[a] von muo[z] iu diu helfe m[i]n durch alle n[o]t s[i]n versaget. ir m[u:]esent haben eine maget diu vollen ...
— A Middle High German Primer - Third Edition • Joseph Wright

... church bells ringing. Sir Graham opened the parlour window wide and listened, leaning out towards the graves. Uniacke was behind him in the room. Vapour streamed up from the buffeted earth, which seemed panting for a repose it had no strength to gain. Ding dong! Ding dong! The wild and far-away light grew to flame and faded to darkness. In the darkness the bells seemed clearer, for light deafens the imagination. Uniacke felt a strange irritability coming upon him. He moved uneasily in his chair, watching the motionless, ...
— Tongues of Conscience • Robert Smythe Hichens

... exceedingly popular in Scotland for a number of ages, particularly among the lower orders. Scott introduces Andrew Fairservice, in 'Rob Roy,' saying, in reference to Francis Osbaldistone's poetical efforts, 'Gude help him! twa lines o' Davie Lyndsay wad ding a' he ever clerkit,' and even still there are districts of the country where his name ...
— Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Complete • George Gilfillan

... "Ding, dong!" went the bell. "Toot-toot-toot!" shrieked the whistle. Poor little Katie Cottontail gave a shiver and dropped her apron. Then clipperty-clip, lipperty-lip she went up the Cow Path to the Old ...
— Little Jack Rabbit's Adventures • David Cory

... caper, caper and crow; There, little baby, there you go, Up to the ceiling, down to the ground, Backwards and forwards, round and round; Dance, little baby, and mother will sing, With the merry coral, ding, ...
— Harry's Ladder to Learning - Horn-Book, Picture-Book, Nursery Songs, Nursery Tales, - Harry's Simple Stories, Country Walks • Anonymous

... boots, light a pipe, and lie on the floor reading—locked up from everyone. Sundays just the same, They called me a sinner, said I was going to the devil—fast. It was my nature. They didn't understand—kept on ding-donging in my ears. Always scrubbing, scouring—you might have eaten your dinner off the floor; always singing psalms—praying— scolding. Couldn't bear it; ran away at fifteen, and have never heard a word from home since. What happened? I came here, worked, saved, bought land, cattle; ...
— The Purple Land • W. H. Hudson

... Lovey ding! such ways of showing how to be merciful!! But the old Jockey himself interfered. "Haud yere tongues, fules," was his speech; "yonder's the man coming wi' a gun. We'll shune put an end to her. She would have won for a hunder pounds, if she hadna broken her leg.—Wha'll wager ...
— The Life of Mansie Wauch - Tailor in Dalkeith, written by himself • David Macbeth Moir

... hauf sin' I startit awa', An Deil faurer forrit was I! Govy-ding! It's nae mows for the heid o' the hoose When the mistress has yokit to cry! A set o' mis-chanters like what I'd come through The strongest o' spirits would tame, I was ettlin' to greet as I stude in the street That nicht that the bairnie ...
— The Auld Doctor and other Poems and Songs in Scots • David Rorie

... bearing that comes of health and strength and a complete absence of self-consciousness. He smiled cheerfully, and nodded his head in response to loud shouts of applause. "Weel done! Verra weel done! That's the way to ding 'em ower! ...
— A Son of Hagar - A Romance of Our Time • Sir Hall Caine

... five thy father lies; Of his bones are coral made; Those are pearls that were his eyes: Nothing of him that doth fade, But doth suffer a sea-change Into something rich and strange. Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell: Ding-dong. Hark! now I ...
— The Hundred Best English Poems • Various

... well, and halting and lame, mingled in Archangel, the half-shabby, half-neat, half-modern, half-ancient, summer-time port on the far northern sea. Rags and red herrings, and broadcloth and books, and O. D. and Khaki, and horizon blue, crowded the dinky ding-ding tramway and counted out kopecs to ...
— The History of the American Expedition Fighting the Bolsheviki - Campaigning in North Russia 1918-1919 • Joel R. Moore

... your doings to rehearse, Your wily snares an' fechtin' fierce, [fighting] Sin' that day Michael did you pierce, Down to this time, Wad ding a' Lallan tongue, or Erse, [heat, Lowland] ...
— Robert Burns - How To Know Him • William Allan Neilson

... father lies; Of his bones are coral made; Those are pearls that were his eyes: Nothing of him that doth fade, But doth suffer a sea-change Into something rich and strange. Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell: Hark! now I hear them—Ding-dong, bell." ...
— Tales from Shakespeare • Charles and Mary Lamb

... was neither pig nor maid, And so she was not of human mould; Not of the living nor the dead. Her left hand and foot were warm to touch; Her right as cold as a corpse's flesh! And she would sing like a funeral bell, with a ding-dong tune. The pigs were afraid, and viewed her aloof; And women feared her and stood afar. She could do without sleep for a year and a day; She could sleep like a corpse, for a month and more. No one knew how this lady fed— On acorns or on flesh. Some say that she's one of the swine-possessed, ...
— Uncle Silas - A Tale of Bartram-Haugh • J.S. Le Fanu

... be served on gold— The wealthy and the great; Two lovers only want A single glass and plate! Ring ding, ring ding, Ring ding ding— Old wine, young lassie, Sing, ...
— The Love Affairs of a Bibliomaniac • Eugene Field

... across the plain Kissed the rear-end door of an east-bound train, And shone on a passing track close by Where a ding-bat sat on a ...
— Songs of the Cattle Trail and Cow Camp • Various

... would sing to me. And as I think, I seem to know How the music of the moon would go. It would be a mystic, murmuring strain Like the falling of far-away fairy rain. Just a soft and silvery song That would swing and swirl along; Not a word Could be heard But a lingering ding-a-dong. Just a melody low and sweet, Just a harmony faint and fleet, Just a croon Of a tune Is the ...
— Patty's Friends • Carolyn Wells

... my mamma coming; here come Sue and Fred; Now there goes the ding-dong, just as if it said, "Little folks and big folks, time to come and sup!" Thank you, papa, thank ...
— The Nursery, May 1873, Vol. XIII. - A Monthly Magazine for Youngest People • Various

... regarding it. There are other kinds of flutes which are played on ordinary occasions. The Wars of the twenty-five villages in the Khyrim State make a sort of harp out of reed, which is called ka 'sing ding phong. The Khasis also play a Jews' Harp (ka mieng), which is ...
— The Khasis • P. R. T. Gurdon

... man who ain't right in his haid, an' looks like er devil—But six dollehs—" After these two attempts at a sentence Williams suddenly appeared as an orator, with a great shiny palm waving in the air. "I tell yeh, jedge, six dollehs is six dollehs, but if I git six dollehs for bo'ding Hennery Johnson, I uhns it! I ...
— The Monster and Other Stories - The Monster; The Blue Hotel; His New Mittens • Stephen Crane

... stroke, another and another, Ding, ding, ding. Tolling at night for the passing of a brother, Ding, ding, ding, One more life from our life is taken, Work all done, and fellowship forsaken, Playmate sleep—and far away awaken, ...
— Here, There And Everywhere • Lord Frederic Hamilton

... red band, which made an excellent target for riflemen and machine-gunners. Occasionally one would rub a handful of mud around the tell-tale band; experience soon taught the Japanese soldiers the dangers of a little colour. It was just ding-dong open fighting, wonderfully spectacular in character. Then a shell burst plunk under the line behind the two foremost enemy trains, which made retreat for them impossible. Desperate efforts were made to repair the line, but well-directed rifle and light machine-gun ...
— With the "Die-Hards" in Siberia • John Ward

... curling full and stately in the breeze. Wonders and misfortunes rarely come unattended. Grim's appetite for the marvellous was now in danger of suffering as much from repletion as before from inanity, and he had just summoned his dame for a special council, when his ears were assailed by a furious ding-dong. Stroke upon stroke, huge, heavy, and unceasing, followed each other in rapid succession. It was the great bell, used only on occasions of emergency and importance, the hoarse tongue of which had been silent since the day of Sir William's departure. ...
— Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 1 (of 2) • John Roby

... waked by the working of the distant engines. Wet property-holder, as you walk home, consider this. When you are next in the Common Council, vote an appropriation for applying Morse's alphabet of long and short to the bells. Then they can be made to sound intelligibly. Daung ding ding,—ding,—ding daung,—daung daung daung, and so on, will tell you as you wake in the night that it is Mr. B.'s store which is on fire, and not yours, or that it is yours and not his. This is not only a convenience to you and a relief to your wife and family, who will thus be spared your excursions ...
— If, Yes and Perhaps - Four Possibilities and Six Exaggerations with Some Bits of Fact • Edward Everett Hale

... Ding, dong, turn the wheel, Wind the purple thread: Spin the white and spin the red, Wind it on the reel: Silk and linen as well as you can, Weave a ...
— The Women of the Arabs • Henry Harris Jessup

... while the harshness of his character has repelled many, his fundamental consistency and his courage have won admiration. As a great preacher, "or he had done with his sermon he was so active and vigorous that he was like to ding the pulpit in blads and fly out of it." His style was direct, vigorous, plain, full of pungent ...
— The Age of the Reformation • Preserved Smith

... for I dinna. It was just as you see it, lang afore your honour was born, an' aiblins, as the by-word says, may be sae after ye're hanged. But that's neither here nor there. The Cummins o' Buchan were a dour and surly race; and, for a fearfu' time, nane near han' nor far awa could ding them, an' yet mony a ane tried it. The fouk on their ain lan' likit them weel enough; but the Crawfords, an' the Grahames, an' the Mars, an' the Lovats, were aye trying to comb them against the hair, ...
— Folk-Lore and Legends - Scotland • Anonymous

... his lines—"thought that rattler was a gin-u-ine one. Ding baste my skin if I didn't. Seemed to me I heard him rattle. Look at the blamed, unconverted insect a-layin' under that pear. Little more, and ...
— Roads of Destiny • O. Henry

... Montezuma still were king, There Charles would wear the crown, And there the Highlanders would ding The Hanoverian down: ...
— The True Story Book • Andrew Lang

... vary very much in the amount of excitement they afford; not differing in this from any other sort of contest. Of the last five races, that of '91 was the most keenly contested, though the '90 race runs it very close. Both of them were ding-dong struggles all the way, now one boat and then the other taking the lead, and neither of them were really won till the post was passed. Closer finishes have been known, though hardly beating these in point of excitement during the race itself. The well-known ...
— The Idler Magazine, Volume III, March 1893 - An Illustrated Monthly • Various

... abroad and came back again wi' some gear; and they say folk maunna take booty in the wars as they did lang syne, and the queen's pay is a sma' matter; there's nae gathering gear on that—and then my grandame's auld—and my sisters wad sit peengin' at the ingle-side for want o' me to ding them about—and Earnscliff, or the neighbourhood, or maybe your ainsell, Elshie, might want some good turn that Hob Elliot could do ye—and it's a pity that the auld house o' the Heugh-foot should be wrecked a'thegither. Sae I was thinking—but deil hae me, that I should say sae," continued ...
— The Black Dwarf • Sir Walter Scott

... Jack. "I'm accused of taking it down and putting it in Grimm's room. They found a rag with arnica on it near the ding-dong, and Old Grimm jumped to the wrong conclusion, basing his belief on what he saw here last night in the first-aid-to-the- injured line. I've got until to-morrow to prove that I ...
— Jack Ranger's Western Trip - From Boarding School to Ranch and Range • Clarence Young

... for them. As twins should go, they fared forth together in quest of the road to wealth. They had been told that it lay toward the West and that it grew broader as one drew nearer the land of the setting sun. The West was the place for young men with ambitions. That expression had been ding- donged into their ears by college mates from Los Angeles and Seattle ever since they had learned that these two towns were something more than mere dots on ...
— Her Weight in Gold • George Barr McCutcheon

... outside the paddock." The master went over about nine o'clock to see what kind of a ploughman was Jack, and what did he see but the little boy driving the bastes, and the sock and coulter of the plough skimming along the sod, and Jack pulling ding-dong again' the horses. ...
— Celtic Fairy Tales • Joseph Jacobs (coll. & ed.)

... the summer lethargy would give place to times of action. Rumours filled the air. Wild they were, but there was definite evidence that something was in the wind, and everybody rejoiced accordingly. There would be a real ding-dong go; ...
— The Tale of a Trooper • Clutha N. Mackenzie

... nobly, and the importance of his giving only his idealized self, the anonymous critic proceeded to comment upon Buerger's frequent lapses from good taste, his crudities, indecencies and vulgar ding-dongs, and to refer these things with remorseless directness to personal defects. The criticism was just and had all the other merits save discretion and urbanity, Goethe was pleased with it before he knew who wrote it,[84] and eleven years later Schiller saw nothing ...
— The Life and Works of Friedrich Schiller • Calvin Thomas

... his wooden leg carefully, and the old sailor was so excited that he mumbled queer sentences about "Araby Ann Knights" and "ding-donged magic" and the "fool foolishness of fussin' with witches an' sich," until Trot wondered whether her old friend had gone crazy or was ...
— Sky Island - Being the further exciting adventures of Trot and Cap'n - Bill after their visit to the sea fairies • L. Frank Baum

... girt caps, An' coits nut quite i' t'fashion; Wi' arms ding-dong, they strut along, An' ...
— Revised Edition of Poems • William Wright

... nicht, wissen Sie, denn er ist schon lange durchgebrannt, und geht nicht beim Tage in einen Laden hinein, wissen Sie—und ich habe keinen Schwiegervater, Gott sei Dank, werde auch nie einen kriegen, werde uberhaupt, wissen Sie, ein solches Ding nie haben, nie dulden, nie ausstehen: warum greifen Sie ein Madchen an, das nur Unschuld kennt, das Ihnen nie Etwas zu Leide gethan hat?' Dann haben sie sich beide die Finger in die Ohren gesteckt und gebetet: 'Allmachtiger Gott! Erbarme Dich unser?' ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... a daughter of mine after old Pharaoh's kine," snapped Keziah with supreme scorn; and at that moment Leam came into the room, and Keziah bustled out of it to tig after Jenny and ding at Tim, as these two faithful servitors were wont to express the way of their ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science - Vol. XVII, No. 102. June, 1876. • Various

... Ding-dong, went the merry bells. Tramp, tramp, went the feet of the big, voluptuous world. Honk, honk, went the horns of the automobiles; for it was Christmas, and all went merry as ...
— Skookum Chuck Fables - Bits of History, Through the Microscope • Skookum Chuck (pseud for R.D. Cumming)

... his eye up the field, "the Ballabeg for leader," he cried, "he's a plate-ribbed man. And let ould Maggie take the butt along with him. Jemmy the Red for the after-rig, and Robbie to follow Mollie with the cart Now ding-dong, boys, bend your backs ...
— The Manxman - A Novel - 1895 • Hall Caine

... cooper ding, cooper ding, ding, ding! Cooper ding, cooper ding, cooper ding, ding, ding! Cooper ding, job, job, Cooper ding, bob, bob, ...
— Winning His Way • Charles Carleton Coffin

... a fact 'that winna ding,' and I do not rely on the theory of suicide. But, if Godfrey was murdered by Catholics, it seems odd that nobody has suggested, as the probable scene, the Savoy, which lay next on the right to Somerset Yard. The Savoy, so well described by ...
— The Valet's Tragedy and Other Stories • Andrew Lang

... growing grass in midsummer meadows, not only the coming of autumn "in dyed garments, travelling in the glory of his apparel," but also the opening buds, the pleasant scents, the tender colours which stir our hearts in "the spring time, the only pretty ring time, when birds do sing, ding-a—dong-ding": these, and a thousand other changes have all their aspects which it is the business of the chemist to investigate. Confronted with so vast a multitude of never-ceasing changes, and ...
— The Story of Alchemy and the Beginnings of Chemistry • M. M. Pattison Muir

... our wedding day; Joyous hour, we give thee greeting! Whither, whither art thou fleeting? Fickle moment, prithee stay! What though mortal joys be hollow? Pleasures come, if sorrows follow: Though the tocsin sound, ere long, Ding dong! Ding dong! Yet until the shadows fall Over one and over all, Sing a merry ...
— Bab Ballads and Savoy Songs • W. S. Gilbert

... say, "you'll ding for your ain side and the Crawfords always, but you'll be a good man; there is nae happiness else, dear. Never rest, my lad, till ye sit where your fathers sat in the House o' Peers. Stand by the State and the Kirk, ...
— Scottish sketches • Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr

... they be tidy; but I'm nowt to Dave. I can shove stronger, but he'd ding [beat] me at it. He's cunning like. Always at it, you see. Straange and ...
— Dick o' the Fens - A Tale of the Great East Swamp • George Manville Fenn

... successful issue of their enterprise, backed up as it was by the Church of Rome, and tired and worn out as the country was by successive revolutions, mutinies of troops, unstable Governments and hopeless bankruptcy. So I thought my chance had come to see some fighting of real ding-dong nature by paying Don Carlos a personal visit. Not that I thought my military qualifications, attained by a few months' residence at the "Shop" as a cadet, in any way qualified me to be of any real military value to Don Carlos, but rather because I thought ...
— The Chronicles of a Gay Gordon • Jose Maria Gordon

... being one minute. Note that in each case there must be three words in addition to the word given. These must be real words, not meaningless syllables or made-up words. However, we should be liberal enough to accept such words as ding (from "ding-dong ") for spring, Jill (see "Jack and Jill") for mill, Fay (girl's ...
— The Measurement of Intelligence • Lewis Madison Terman

... onslaught of the German right on Nieuport. Haig's outflanking project had been rendered equally impossible by the strength of the German resistance to Rawlinson's move on Menin, and by the 21st both sides had been pinned down to a ding-dong soldiers' battle all along the front. Its chronology is as important as its localities, and it is hard to follow the course of the struggle if the narrative loses itself in the different threads of the various corps engaged. For all were fighting at the same time, and the only generalizations ...
— A Short History of the Great War • A.F. Pollard

... only allowed to bid my wife "Good-morning" under the strictest supervision, and of Mistress Pathrick—who, after one sole taste of my grandmother's tongue, had retired defeated with the muttered criticism that "that tongue o' the auld leddy's could ding a' the Luckenbooths—aye, and the West Bow as weel." However, once subjected, she proved a kindly and a willing slave. I have, however, my suspicions that in these days Mr. Pathrick McGrier, ex-janitor of the Latin classroom, had but a poor time of it so far as the ...
— The Dew of Their Youth • S. R. Crockett



Words linked to "Ding" :   dig, gouge, ring, sound, defect, peal, mar, dong, blemish, ding-dong



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