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Ding   /dɪŋ/   Listen
Ding

verb
(past & past part. dinged, obs. dang, or obs. dung; pres. part. dinging)
1.
Go 'ding dong', like a bell.  Synonyms: dingdong, dong.



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"Ding" Quotes from Famous Books



... target for riflemen and machine-gunners. Occasionally one would rub a handful of mud around the tell-tale band; experience soon taught the Japanese soldiers the dangers of a little colour. It was just ding-dong open fighting, wonderfully spectacular in character. Then a shell burst plunk under the line behind the two foremost enemy trains, which made retreat for them impossible. Desperate efforts were made to repair the line, but well-directed ...
— With the "Die-Hards" in Siberia • John Ward

... the skies His hands have built, where holy fires To Samas burn; its flame ne'er dies, To holiness lead man's desires. He opens wide the fiery gates Of all the gods at Dintir old, Ka-ding-ir-a.[4] This day completes His grandeur—may it far be told Of our great Sar whose godly gate Wide opens Heaven's joy for man, Of Iz-zu-bar-ili the great, Who rules from Khar-sak to the main. Within the entrance to the royal rooms, Queen Ishtar with her train in splendor comes, Her radiant ...
— Babylonian and Assyrian Literature • Anonymous

... quiet there that you might almost tell the time without looking at the clock. When you heard cling, clang, from the blacksmith's forge, and quack, quack, from the army of ducks waddling down to the river, it was five o'clock. Ding, dong from the church-tower, and the tall figure of Mr Vallance climbing the hill to read prayers—eight o'clock. So on throughout the day until evening came, and you knew that soon after the cows had gone lowing through the ...
— A Pair of Clogs • Amy Walton

... nothing but flesh and blood wanting to make it completely a claw! This was an organ, and had all the notes of an organ, etc. etc. etc.; but, alas! with all possible straining of my eyes, ears, and imagination, I could see nothing but common stalactite, and heard nothing but the dull ding of common cavern stones. One thing was really striking;—a huge cone of stalactite hung from the roof of the largest apartment, and, on being struck, gave perfectly the sound of a death-bell. I was behind, and heard it repeatedly at some distance, and the effect was very much in the fairy ...
— Biographia Epistolaris, Volume 1. • Coleridge, ed. Turnbull

... Ding a Ding, And Ho Ding a Ding, I'm finely brought to Bed; My Lord has stole that troublesome Thing, ...
— The Merry-Thought: or the Glass-Window and Bog-House Miscellany - Parts 2, 3 and 4 • Hurlo Thrumbo (pseudonym)

... his lines—"thought that rattler was a gin-u-ine one. Ding baste my skin if I didn't. Seemed to me I heard him rattle. Look at the blamed, unconverted insect a-layin' under that pear. Little more, and somebody would ...
— Roads of Destiny • O. Henry

... second year of teaching was, in the opinion of the pupils, highly successful. Some of the wonder- thoughts of her heart she succeeded in imparting to them in that little rural school. As she tugged at the bell rope and sent the ding-dong pealing over the countryside with its call that brought the children from many roads and byways she felt an irresistible thrill pulsating through her. It was as if the big bell called, "Here, come here, come here! We'll ...
— Amanda - A Daughter of the Mennonites • Anna Balmer Myers

... till he could not hold his pen to write. No doubt the prophet was denouncing "that last Beast," the Pope, and his allies in Scotland, as he had done these many years ago. Ere he had finished his sermon "he was like to ding the pulpit to blads and fly out of it." He attended a play, written by Davidson, later a famous preacher, on the siege and fall of the Castle, exhibiting the hanging of his old ally, Kirkcaldy, "according to Mr. Knox's ...
— John Knox and the Reformation • Andrew Lang

... did Burrell wish the good preacher—no matter where; but his wishes availed nought, for he remained close to his side, holding forth, without intermission, in the same monotonous tone, that sounded like the ding-dong, ding-dong of a curfew-bell ...
— The Buccaneer - A Tale • Mrs. S. C. Hall

... among the senoras of Mexico—particularly among those who dwell in cities and towns. Close upon the heels of daybreak you may see them issuing from the great doors of their houses, and hurrying through the streets towards the chapel, where the bell has already begun its deafening "ding-dong." They are muffled beyond the possibility of recognition— the richer in their silken shawls and mantas, the poorer in their slate-coloured rebosos; under the folds of which each carries a little ...
— The White Chief - A Legend of Northern Mexico • Mayne Reid

... Monsters Ding Palmer Air Detective Beyond the Dog's Nose Cameron McBain Backwoodsman Don Rader, Trail ...
— The Outdoor Girls at Bluff Point - Or a Wreck and a Rescue • Laura Lee Hope

... good," he said. "You ought to hev seen them folks when he rode out of the wood. Flabbergasted ain't the word. They was ding-busted." ...
— Tish, The Chronicle of Her Escapades and Excursions • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... than ever tew see him face tew face, afore I quits this here region. It's jest gut tew be done, else I wudn't hev ther nerve tew face Little Lina agin. She made me promise; an' by thunder! nawthin' hain't agoin' tew skeer me off. If he doan't hunt me out, by ding! I'll take a turn at hit, an' find Cale Martin myself, ef so be I gotter tramp all the way tew his shack, wich I knows ...
— The Boy Scouts in the Maine Woods - The New Test for the Silver Fox Patrol • Herbert Carter

... load was replaced. But we were off the road, and a search was begun with lights to find the beaten path. Footsore and hungry, with an almost intolerable thirst, we trudged along till morning, to the ding-dong, ding-dong of the deep-toned camel-bells. Finally we reached a sluggish river, but did not dare to satisfy our thirst, except by washing out our mouths, and by taking occasional swallows, with long intervals of rest, in one of which we fell asleep from sheer exhaustion. ...
— Across Asia on a Bicycle • Thomas Gaskell Allen and William Lewis Sachtleben

... these heathen temples; and when we recollect that at the time of the Reformation in civilized England, the most splendid Catholic edifices were made level with the ground, in compliance with the ferocious edict of John Knox, "Ding down the nests, and the rooks will fly off," we can have little wonder or blame to bestow upon Cortes, who, in the excitement of the siege, gave orders for the destruction of these blood- stained sanctuaries. In the ...
— Life in Mexico • Frances Calderon de la Barca

... a hauf sin' I startit awa', An Deil faurer forrit was I! Govy-ding! It's nae mows for the heid o' the hoose When the mistress has yokit to cry! A set o' mis-chanters like what I'd come through The strongest o' spirits would tame, I was ettlin' to greet as I stude in the street That nicht that ...
— The Auld Doctor and other Poems and Songs in Scots • David Rorie

... sickle. "He's a David, he'll smite down his thousands/," said Caesar. Then cocking his eye up the field, "the Ballabeg for leader," he cried, "he's a plate-ribbed man. And let ould Maggie take the butt along with him. Jemmy the Red for the after-rig, and Robbie to follow Mollie with the cart Now ding-dong, boys, bend your backs and down ...
— The Manxman - A Novel - 1895 • Hall Caine

... neighbourhood, had converted into a football pitch. Small wonder then that we challenged the owners to a game, and a great game it was. The Scotsmen had an unbeaten record in Egypt, which they maintained, but only after a ding-dong game which the battalion ...
— The Seventh Manchesters - July 1916 to March 1919 • S. J. Wilson

... them the twelve tunes of his musical-box. It was pleasant to see him with that musical-box—how pleased he wound it up after dinner—how happily he listened to the little clinking tunes as they galloped, ding-dong, after each other! A man who carries a musical-box is ...
— Notes on a Journey from Cornhill to Grand Cairo • William Makepeace Thackeray

... a splendid list of Romances and Old Ballads possessed by this said CAPTAIN COX; and tells us, moreover, that "he had them all at his fingers ends." Among the ballads we find "Broom broom on Hil; So Wo is me begon twlly lo; Over a Whinny Meg; Hey ding a ding; Bony lass upon Green; My bony on gave me a bek; By a bank as I lay; and two more he had fair wrapt up in parchment, and bound with a whip cord." Edit. 1784, p. 36-7-8. Ritson, in his Historical Essay on Scottish Song, speaks of some of these, with ...
— Bibliomania; or Book-Madness - A Bibliographical Romance • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... Ding! The old door-bell sounded. Beth drooped her head, but the bell had attracted her father's attention, and Aunt Prudence thrust her head into the parlor ...
— Beth Woodburn • Maud Petitt

... as we do," replied Poddie, dubiously. "But what does that mean?" added he, startled by the brazen clangor of a large bell that rung high above the noises a warning "Ding-dong, ding-dong, ding." ...
— Harper's Young People, July 27, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... meadows, not only the coming of autumn "in dyed garments, travelling in the glory of his apparel," but also the opening buds, the pleasant scents, the tender colours which stir our hearts in "the spring time, the only pretty ring time, when birds do sing, ding-a—dong-ding": these, and a thousand other changes have all their aspects which it is the business of the chemist to investigate. Confronted with so vast a multitude of never-ceasing changes, and ...
— The Story of Alchemy and the Beginnings of Chemistry • M. M. Pattison Muir

... the morning of May, Ere the children had entered my gate With their wreaths and mechanical lay, A metal ding-dong of the date! I mounted our hill, bearing heart That had little of life save its weight: The crowned Shadow poising dart Hung over her: she, my own, My good companion, mate, Pulse of me: she who had shown Fortitude quiet as Earth's At the ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... found that O'Connell had altered the terms of his motion, and that Althorp, Littleton, and the Solicitor-General had agreed to support it; in short, that O'Connell had laid a trap for them, and they had gone ding-dong into it. Stanley was very angry and much annoyed, but the thing being done he knocked under, and tried to bolster up the business. Graham would not, and in a maudlin, stupid sort of speech declared his opposition, which was honest enough. All this ...
— The Greville Memoirs - A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William IV, Vol. III • Charles C. F. Greville

... only one who would have liked to compel the bell to ring; he was very indignant at the political condescendence of his superior officer towards the priest; and every day he was beseeching the Commander to let him do once, just once, "Ding-dong! Ding-dong!" merely for the sake of having a little fun. And he begged for it with feline gracefulness, the cajolery of a woman, the tenderness of voice of a beloved mistress craving for something, but the Commander did not yield, and to console himself, Mademoiselle Fifi exploded mines ...
— Mademoiselle Fifi • Guy de Maupassant

... sounds blended into one. There were the rhythmical beat of hoofs, the low undertone of the wheels grinding the pavement, the high note of the forged steel lock-opener as it hammered the foot-board, the mellow ding-dong of the bell, the creak of the forty-and fifty-foot extensions, the rattle of the iron-shod hooks, the rat-tat-tat of the scaling ladders on the bridge and the muffled drumming of the leather helmets as ...
— Horses Nine - Stories of Harness and Saddle • Sewell Ford

... for a day, to the cool white rooms, to see the nuns flitting about like black and white ghosts, with only a jingle of beads to warn one of their coming, see the blue sky through the great bare windows, and the shadows of the trees lengthening on the cold flagged floors, hear the bells going ding-dong, ding-dong, and the murmur of the sea in the distance, and the drone of the school, and the drone of the chapel, to go back, and feel once more the dull sort of ...
— The Light of Scarthey • Egerton Castle

... have been most perseveringly and ding-dong-doggedly at work, making headway but slowly. The spring always has a restless influence over me; and I weary, at any season, of this London dining-out beyond expression; and I yearn for the country again. This is my excuse for not having written to you sooner. ...
— The Letters of Charles Dickens - Vol. 2 (of 3), 1857-1870 • Charles Dickens

... as she limped, still and ever lame with rheumatism, towards the third member of the procession. "Gin I had the loon that did it," she went on, fumbling, with a haste that defeated itself, at the knot that bound Hawkie's nose to the tail of the cadger's horse—"gin I had the loon 'at did it, I wad ding the sowl oot o' his wame, ...
— Alec Forbes of Howglen • George MacDonald

... to year. While the forty-year-old objections are raised the forty-year-old rejoinders must be given. We must continue to agitate until we force people to listen. It is like the ringing of a bell. At first no one notices it; in a little while, a few will listen; finally, the perpetual ding-dong, ding-dong, will force itself to be heard by every one. The oldest of all the old arguments is that of right and justice, and the tune which my little bell shall ring is merely this: "It is right!" This cry ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume III (of III) • Various

... wouldn't call a daughter of mine after old Pharaoh's kine," snapped Keziah with supreme scorn; and at that moment Leam came into the room, and Keziah bustled out of it to tig after Jenny and ding at Tim, as these two faithful servitors were wont to express the way of their mistress ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science - Vol. XVII, No. 102. June, 1876. • Various

... day; Joyous hour, we give thee greeting! Whither, whither art thou fleeting? Fickle moment, prithee stay! What though mortal joys be hollow? Pleasures come, if sorrows follow: Though the tocsin sound, ere long, Ding dong! Ding dong! Yet until the shadows fall Over one and over all, Sing a ...
— Bab Ballads and Savoy Songs • W. S. Gilbert

... while our noble king, His broadsword brandishing, Down the French host did ding,[11] As to o'erwhelm it; And many a deep wound lent, His arms with blood besprent, And many a cruel dent Bruised ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 5 • Charles Sylvester

... huge, clumsy brutes quite done up, even on the gentlest incline. The track went up and up in zigzag and curves, the cries of the camel-drivers were constantly urging on the perplexed animals, and the dingle of the smaller bells somewhat enlivened the slow, monotonous ding-dong of the huge cylindrical bell—some two and a half feet high and one foot in diameter—tied to the load of the last camel, and mournfully resounding in the valley ...
— Across Coveted Lands - or a Journey from Flushing (Holland) to Calcutta Overland • Arnold Henry Savage Landor

... she go, ding dong, ding dong, its back, encore again An' ole chanson come on ma head of "a la claire fontaine," I'm not surprise it soun' so sweet, more sweeter I can tell For wit' de song also I hear de bell of ...
— The Habitant and Other French-Canadian Poems • William Henry Drummond

... what to think, but ding me if we ain't hittin' the ball," said Spears. Then to his players: "A little more of that and we're back in our old shape. All in a minute—at 'em now! Rube, ...
— The Redheaded Outfield and Other Baseball Stories • Zane Grey

... tryin' to kick you. If it wa'n't for that streak in human nature them devilish trusts that I've heard tell of couldn't live a minit." He saw men standing afar and staring at him apprehensively. "That's right, ding baste ye," he said, musingly, "look up to me and keep your distance! It don't make no gre't diff'runce how it's done, so long as ...
— The Skipper and the Skipped - Being the Shore Log of Cap'n Aaron Sproul • Holman Day

... been dreading. Ben's gait was the hop-skip-and-jump—proof enough that his heart was light and his anticipations high. He was eating an apple, and giving a long, melodious whoop, at intervals, followed by a deep-toned ding-dong-dong, ding-dong-dong, for he was personating a steamboat. As he drew near, he slackened speed, took the middle of the street, leaned far over to starboard and rounded to ponderously and with laborious pomp and circumstance—for he was ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... ding down Tantallon, and make a bridge to the Bass," was an adage expressive of impossibility. The shattered ruins of this celebrated fortress still overhang a tremendous rock on the coast of ...
— Minstrelsy of the Scottish border (3rd ed) (1 of 3) • Walter Scott

... Captain Cocke was there, and he did so swear and curse at the boy that told me. So Cocke, Griffin, and the boy with me, they to find the housekeeper of the Parliament, Hughes, while I to Sir W. Coventry, but could hear nothing of it there. But coming to our rendezvous at the Swan Taverne, in Ding Streete, I find they have found the housekeeper, and the book simply locked up in the Court. So I staid and drank, and rewarded the doore-keeper, and away home, my heart lighter by all this, but to bed very sad notwithstanding, in fear of what will happen to-morrow ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... worthy of Dresden!" says Mr. Musgrave, throwing back his head and looking up at the pale blue sultriness above our heads—the waveless, stormless ether sea—as we pace along, with the church-bells' measured ding-dong in our ears, and the cool ripe ...
— Nancy - A Novel • Rhoda Broughton

... to the steps of the tribune. He is bent upon renewing the attempt to raise his voice above the hostile din. The sight of him unchains the House's fury afresh. The racket is increased by the mad ding-donging of "Papa" Kaempf, trying hopelessly to restore a semblance of quiet. It is useless. The House will not subside until Liebknecht is driven from the speakers' tribune. He is not to have even the chance of the lull which enabled Ledebour to say a pertinent thing or two. A ...
— The Land of Deepening Shadow - Germany-at-War • D. Thomas Curtin

... Ding! dong! ding! the notes came dropping through the air, clear and resonant. Even a deaf person might hear them, perhaps. Mrs. Mellen was evidently struggling with herself. Once she opened her lips as if ...
— "Some Say" - Neighbours in Cyrus • Laura Elizabeth Howe Richards

... and of boldness I bear evermore the bell; Of main and of might I master every man; I ding with my doughtiness the Devil down to Hell; For both of Heaven and of ...
— Shakespeare: His Life, Art, And Characters, Volume I. • H. N. Hudson

... people hold! Two young fellows quarrel— Then they fight, for both are bold— Rage of both is uncontrolled— Both are stretched out, stark and cold! Prithee, where's the moral? Ding dong! Ding dong! There's an end to further action, And this barbarous transaction Is described as "satisfaction"! Ha! ha! ha! ha! satisfaction! Ding dong! Ding dong! Each is laid in churchyard mould— Strange ...
— The Complete Plays of Gilbert and Sullivan - The 14 Gilbert And Sullivan Plays • William Schwenk Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan

... thy father lies: Of his bones are coral made: Those are pearls that were his eyes; Nothing of him that doth fade, But doth suffer a sea change Into something rich and strange; Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell: Hark! now I hear them,— Ding, dong, bell. ...
— The Children's Garland from the Best Poets • Various

... hung a big bell, whose brazen tongue had once upon a time alarmed the good people of Stanhope by ding-donging at a most unusual hour. It had come through a prank played upon the scouts by several tough boys of the town whose enmity Paul Morrison and his chums had been unfortunate enough to incur. But for the details of that exciting episode the reader will have to be ...
— The Banner Boy Scouts Afloat • George A. Warren

... Tyball (cousin to the skirt) Sprags 'em an' makes a start to sling off dirt. Nex' minnit there's a reel ole ding-dong go— 'Arf round or so. Mick Curio, 'e gets it in the neck, "Ar rats!" 'e sez, an' passes ...
— The Songs of a Sentimental Bloke • C. J. Dennis

... to loathe you when you kept forever ding-donging at me about the way I ate when I was almost starving. Were you never a hungry little kid? Did you never lick jam and honey ...
— The Prince of Graustark • George Barr McCutcheon

... Russ, making believe he was the steamboat's whistle. Then he ding-donged the bell and hissed, to let off steam. Violet and Laddie laughed, and did the same thing, pretending they were part of the engine of ...
— Six Little Bunkers at Aunt Jo's • Laura Lee Hope

... go it, milady! Foot fleetly The paths that are primrose and gay; Abandon your fancy completely To follies and fads of the day. "Reform" is a something that throttles The joys of the pace that's intense— Smash hearts, reputations, and bottles, And ding ...
— A line-o'-verse or two • Bert Leston Taylor

... Eve thy father lies, Of his bones are coral made: Those are pearls that were his eyes, Nothing of him that doth fade, But doth suffer a sea change, Into something rich and strange. Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell— Hark! I now I hear them, ding-dong bell. [Burden ding-dong.] ...
— Characters of Shakespeare's Plays • William Hazlitt

... "Der bropper ding! . . . Confound all dis stupid nonsense!" cried poor Schmucke, driven to the last degree of exasperation which a childlike soul can reach under ...
— Poor Relations • Honore de Balzac

... Ding, ding! To the carriages, gentlemen the travellers. Ascend then, gentlemen the travellers, for Hazebroucke, Lille, Douai, Bruxelles, Arras, Amiens, and Paris! I, humble representative of the uncommercial interest, ...
— The Uncommercial Traveller • Charles Dickens

... withdrawn, as if seeing things that were invisible; his shut mouth, like a child's, so impressionable, so innocent, so sad: he was now all within, as before he was all without; hence his brooding look. As the snow blattered in his face, he muttered, "How it raves and drifts! On-ding o' snaw,—ay, that's the word,—on-ding—" He was now at his own door, "Castle Street, No.39." He opened the door, and went straight to his den; that wondrous workshop, where, in one year, 1823, when he was fifty-two, he wrote "Peveril of the Peak," "Quentin Durward," and "St. Ronan's ...
— Stories of Childhood • Various

... movement among the troops, less sitting about for orders. Officers were riding up and down the roads, and wheeling into little groups for quick discussion. Something was happening— something more than the ding-dong slam of the guns. A regiment of Belgian infantry came plodding through the mud, covered with whitish clay even to their top-hats. They were earth-men, with the blanched look of creatures who live below ground. The news was whispered ...
— The Soul of the War • Philip Gibbs

... swinging his unfinished basket to and fro for a cradle. He was too stiff in the joints for dancing nowadays, but he still sang the "bloomin' gy-ar-ding" when ever they asked him, particularly if some apple-cheeked little maid would say, "Please, Tom!" He always laughed then, and, patting the child's hand, said, "Pooty gal,—got eyes!" The youngsters dance with glee at this meaningless phrase, just ...
— The Village Watch-Tower • (AKA Kate Douglas Riggs) Kate Douglas Wiggin

... "Gol ding him!" growled Ephraim, as he followed Barney into the smoking compartment. "He's a bigger crank than ever! He's gittin' ...
— Frank Merriwell's Son - A Chip Off the Old Block • Burt L. Standish

... be tidy; but I'm nowt to Dave. I can shove stronger, but he'd ding [beat] me at it. He's cunning like. Always at it, you ...
— Dick o' the Fens - A Tale of the Great East Swamp • George Manville Fenn

... some savage country, skulk into my room, throw off my boots, light a pipe, and lie on the floor reading—locked up from everyone. Sundays just the same, They called me a sinner, said I was going to the devil—fast. It was my nature. They didn't understand—kept on ding-donging in my ears. Always scrubbing, scouring—you might have eaten your dinner off the floor; always singing psalms—praying— scolding. Couldn't bear it; ran away at fifteen, and have never heard a word from home ...
— The Purple Land • W. H. Hudson

... "Ding bat yer," Bud would shout, "yer ornery, unsanctified, muley, harebrained, contaminated son o' a zebra, git down on yer feet an' foller. Ye'll git all that's comin' ter yer when ther race starts. Save ...
— Ted Strong's Motor Car • Edward C. Taylor

... Montezuma still were king, There Charles would wear the crown, And there the Highlanders would ding ...
— The True Story Book • Andrew Lang

... persistently, over and over again, and loudest outside Fritzing's door, was a German song about how beautiful it is at evening when the bells ring one to rest, and the refrain at the end of each verse was ding-dong twice repeated. Priscilla rang her own bell, unable to endure it, but Annalise did not consider this to be one of those that are beautiful and did not answer it till it had been rung ...
— The Princess Priscilla's Fortnight • Elizabeth von Arnim

... complain that you are not sufficiently impressed by the fact of its being Christmas Eve. The ding-ding-dong of the bells of Notre Dame fails to move you; and just now when the magic-lantern passed beneath the window, I looked at you while pretending to work, ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... positively dead![66] "Mijnheer, min. moet mij tog een ding beloove; om als de oorlog verbij is, die preek van min. te laat druk enz enz, Om te doen gedenken" (Sir, you must promise me one thing, to publish your sermon on 'To bring to remembrance' when the war ...
— Woman's Endurance • A.D.L.

... go away as soon as I intended. I stayed for the night, while the wind and the rat and the sash and the window-bolt played a ding-dong "hundred and fifty up." Then the wind ran out and the billiards stopped, and I felt that I had ruined my ...
— The Works of Rudyard Kipling One Volume Edition • Rudyard Kipling

... business. The war left me flat on my back with all the family niggers free, but a chunk of money came to my children—fifty thousand dollars. It stood in their name, but I got their legal consent to handle it. Mostyn knew I had it and was constantly ding-donging at me about his mill idea. Well, I went in—I risked the whole amount. He was made president although he didn't hold ten thousand dollars' worth of stock. Then I reckon you know what happened. He run the thing plumb in the ground, claimed ...
— The Desired Woman • Will N. Harben

... Then, ding-dang-dong, and, at the sleepy usher's nod, a sleepy boy would rise and recite the perfunctory evening prayer in a dull singsong voice—beginning, "Notre Pere, qui etes aux cieux, vous dont le regard scrutateur ...
— The Martian • George Du Maurier

... train, very fast. "Chug, chug, chug," went the engine. "Toot, toot," went the whistle. "Ding, dong, ding, dong," went the bell. Soon ...
— Prince and Rover of Cloverfield Farm • Helen Fuller Orton

... Bells of Berlin, how they hearten the Hun (Oh, dingle dong dangle ding dongle ding dee;) No matter what devil's own work has been done They chime a loud chant of approval, each one, Till the people feel sure of their place in the sun (Oh, dangle ding dongle dong ...
— New York Times Current History; The European War, Vol 2, No. 2, May, 1915 - April-September, 1915 • Various

... willingly tolerated their silent patriotism. Only little Baron Wilhelm would have liked to have forced them to ring the bells. He was very angry at his superior's politic compliance with the priest's scruples, and every day he begged the commandant to allow him to sound "ding-dong, ding-dong," just once, only just once, just by way of a joke. And he asked it like a wheedling woman, in the tender voice of some mistress who wishes to obtain something, but the commandant would not yield, and to console herself, Mademoiselle Fifi made a ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume II (of 8) • Guy de Maupassant

... mine own sweetheart, From thee I'll never depart; Thou art my Ciperlillie, And I thy Trangdidowne-dilly: And sing, Hey ding a ding ding, And do the tother thing: And when 'tis done, not miss To give my wench a kiss: And then dance, Canst thou not hit it? Ho, brave ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. IX • Various

... "Ding, dong!" went the bell. "Toot-toot-toot!" shrieked the whistle. Poor little Katie Cottontail gave a shiver and dropped her apron. Then clipperty-clip, lipperty-lip she went up the Cow Path to the Old Brush Heap ...
— Little Jack Rabbit's Adventures • David Cory

... Dass ist herrlich!" and he drew off the last drops of Pomino. "Now I will tell you vun ding. Hev you ...
— In Troubadour-Land - A Ramble in Provence and Languedoc • S. Baring-Gould

... breakfast, and wash the breakfast things, and be in your places early, with bowed heads and reverend minds, and demurely hear me tell you what sinners you always have been and always will be, so help me God—I, Everardus Bogardus, in the clear summer morning, ding, ...
— Trumps • George William Curtis

... saw that the other was stopping. We raced as one horse at the very last hedge—just a nose in front was Crusader; I felt the big Brown bump twice at my side, and knew he was ready to blunder. With stirrups a-ding, empty-saddled the Bay, stride for stride, galloped and floundered. Just missing his swerve, I called on the Black, and drew out as ...
— Thoroughbreds • W. A. Fraser

... bull. And my bull Bevis, he hath lost one of his eyes, but I think if you had him he would do you more hurt than good, for I protest I think he would either throw up your dogs into the lofts, or else ding out ...
— Shakespearean Playhouses - A History of English Theatres from the Beginnings to the Restoration • Joseph Quincy Adams

... shall I tell?— Two mournful sisters, And a tolling knell, Tolling ding and tolling ...
— Types of Children's Literature • Edited by Walter Barnes

... 'Ding, dong,' tolled the hyacinth bells; 'we are not tolling for little Kay; we know nothing about him. We sing our song, ...
— Stories from Hans Andersen • Hans Christian Andersen

... blackguarding at a dreadful rate, and upbraiding on account of some ploy he had had with the Dalmailing session anent a bairn, in an unguarded moment lifted his hand, and shook his neive in Jean's face, and even, as she said, struck her. He himself swore an affidavit that he gave her only a ding out of his way; but be this as it may, at him rushed Jean with open mouth, and broke her timbermeal-basin on his head, as it had been an egg- shell. Heaven only knows what next ensued; but in a jiffy the whole market-place was as white with ...
— The Provost • John Galt

... tree-tops waving high, "Don't you hear the happy tidings Whispered to the earth and sky? Have you caught them in your dreaming, Brook and rill in snowy dells? Do you know the joy we bring you In the merry Christmas bells? Ding, dong! ding, ...
— The Nursery, No. 169, January, 1881, Vol. XXIX - A Monthly Magazine for Youngest Readers • Various

... heard my father say," she declared, "that in his time every second man you met with in the streets of London was monk or priest; churches stood everywhere, and there was a perpetual ding-dong of bells from morn till night. Now you will look in vain for a monk; the bells are grown silent; and the churches are heaps of ruins, or their sites occupied by warehouses built of their stones. The monasteries and nunneries are turned into dwelling-places ...
— Sea-Dogs All! - A Tale of Forest and Sea • Tom Bevan

... Bengan: Pers. Bdingn or Badiljn; the Mala insana (Solanum pomiferum or S. Melongena) of the Romans, well known in Southern Europe. It is of two kinds, the red (Solanum lycopersicum) and the black (S. Melongena). The Spaniards know it as "berengeria" and when Sancho Panza (Part ii. chapt. 2) says, ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... dong, ding dong, its back, encore again An' ole chanson come on ma head of "a la claire fontaine," I'm not surprise it soun' so sweet, more sweeter I can tell For wit' de song also I hear de bell of ...
— The Habitant and Other French-Canadian Poems • William Henry Drummond

... sayde soon, 'Naye, In faythe ye wolde hav ren awaye, When moste misstirre had bin; Ye all can speke safte wordes at home, The fiend wolde ding yow doone ilk on, An yt bee als ...
— Ancient Poems, Ballads and Songs of England • Robert Bell

... how we might have been ten times, twenty times, as happy if we'd only kept on steady ding-dong work, like George Storefield, having patience and seeing ourselves get better off—even a little—year by year. What had he come to? And what lay before us? And though we were that fond of poor mother and Aileen that we would have done anything in the world for ...
— Robbery Under Arms • Thomas Alexander Browne, AKA Rolf Boldrewood

... the school with all its pedantries and brazen ignorance, 'High Art' with its new graces, divinity, Mar-texts and all, must 'come hither, come hither,' and 'under the green-wood tree lie with me,' the ding-dong of this philosopher's new learning says, calling his new school together. This is the linguist that will find 'tongues in trees,' and crowd out from the halls of learning the lore of ancient parchments with their verdant classics, their 'truth in beauty dyed.' This ...
— The Philosophy of the Plays of Shakspere Unfolded • Delia Bacon

... is always making it is because he is the town crier to every Indian garden, and tells all the news to everybody who cares to listen. As Rikki-tikki went up the path, he heard his "attention" notes like a tiny dinner gong, and then the steady "Ding-dong-tock! Nag is dead—dong! Nagaina is dead! Ding-dong-tock!" That set all the birds in the garden singing, and the frogs croaking, for Nag and Nagaina used to eat frogs as well as ...
— The Jungle Book • Rudyard Kipling

... the last guest For his home long since had started, Low the chestnut trees were whispering. Said the one: "Oh fresco paintings!" Said the other: "Oh thou ding dong!" Then the first: "I see the future— See there two remorseless workmen, See two monstrous painting-brushes, See two buckets full of whitewash. And they quietly daub over, With a heavy coating, heroes, Deities, and Fludribus. ...
— The Trumpeter of Saekkingen - A Song from the Upper Rhine. • Joseph Victor von Scheffel

... at last the summer lethargy would give place to times of action. Rumours filled the air. Wild they were, but there was definite evidence that something was in the wind, and everybody rejoiced accordingly. There would be a real ding-dong go; and ...
— The Tale of a Trooper • Clutha N. Mackenzie

... I made man for ever: I'll not leave my horse for forty:[141] if he had but the quality of hey-ding-ding, hey-ding-ding, I'd make a brave living on him: he has a buttock as slick as an eel [Aside].—Well, God b'wi'ye, sir: your boy will deliver him me: but, hark you, sir; if my horse be sick or ill at ease, if I bring his water to you, you'll tell ...
— The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus • Christopher Marlowe

... "Ding-ding-ding!" That was tea. Would Doe be any less happy when he saw my vacant place, and wonder if I were very ill? How was Penny feeling, who had lifted up his heel against me? Might he, together with Stanley and his colleagues, think me dying! What would Stanley and the prefects do to Doe ...
— Tell England - A Study in a Generation • Ernest Raymond

... metallic clangour of a bell went bang, bang, bang, from one roof; not far distant a harsher and deeper note—some Tartar-like bell of universal uproar—hammered away. At intervals came the distant chimes of three distinct village churches—ding dong, dong ding, pango, frango, jango—very much jango—bang, clatter, clash—a humming vibration and dreadful stir. The country world was up in arms, I was about to say—I mean in chimney-pot hat and pomade, en route to its various creeds, some to one bell, some to another, some to ding dong, ...
— Field and Hedgerow • Richard Jefferies

... chaps wi' their girt caps, An' coits nut quite i' t'fashion; Wi' arms ding-dong, they strut along, An' put a famous ...
— Revised Edition of Poems • William Wright

... working of the distant engines. Wet property-holder, as you walk home, consider this. When you are next in the Common Council, vote an appropriation for applying Morse's alphabet of long and short to the bells. Then they can be made to sound intelligibly. Daung ding ding,—ding,—ding daung,—daung daung daung, and so on, will tell you, as you wake in the night, that it is Mr. B.'s store which is on fire, and not yours, or that it is yours, and not his. This is not only a convenience to you and ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 2, Issue 12, October, 1858 • Various

... knell is ringing The raven is singing The earth worm is creeping The mourners are weeping Ding ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume I • Percy Bysshe Shelley

... Viscount, "was rather more so than usual, actually wanted me to give up the Race! After that of course I had to be firm with him, and we had a slight—ah, misunderstanding in consequence—fathers, as a rule, are so infernally parental and inconsiderate! Met Carnaby on the road, raced him for a hundred; ding-dong all the way, wheel and wheel to Bromley, though he nearly ditched me twice, confound him! Coming down Mason's Hill I gave him my dust, up the rise he drew level again. 'Ease up for the town, Carnaby,' says I, 'Be damned if I do!' says he, so at it we went, ...
— The Amateur Gentleman • Jeffery Farnol et al

... tactful Miss Pratt proposed, hastily. "Come on, May and Cousin Johnnie-Jump-Up," she called to Miss Parcher and Mr. Watson. "Singin'-school, dirls an' boys! Singin'-school! Ding, ding! Singin'-school ...
— Seventeen - A Tale Of Youth And Summer Time And The Baxter Family Especially William • Booth Tarkington

... Lovey ding! such ways of showing how to be merciful!! But the old Jockey himself interfered. "Haud yere tongues, fules," was his speech; "yonder's the man coming wi' a gun. We'll shune put an end to her. She would have won for ...
— The Life of Mansie Wauch - Tailor in Dalkeith, written by himself • David Macbeth Moir

... just now ringing, ding dong, but whether for this, I cannot presently tell; but it is likely enough, for I have known them ring upon much foolisher ...
— Selected English Letters (XV - XIX Centuries) • Various

... are shut. Think of that: cradled innocence and angels' dreams and the whole of the hymn just before ding-dong-bang on noses and jaws! That means confidence? Looks like it. But Kitty's not asleep you try him. He's only quiet because he has got to undergo great exertion. Last fight he was knocked out of time, because he went into it honest drunk, they tell. And the earl ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith



Words linked to "Ding" :   defect, blemish, mar, sound, peal, ring, dig



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