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Daffodil   /dˈæfədˌɪl/   Listen
Daffodil

noun
1.
Any of numerous varieties of Narcissus plants having showy often yellow flowers with a trumpet-shaped central crown.  Synonym: Narcissus pseudonarcissus.



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"Daffodil" Quotes from Famous Books



... feet on wavy breast of rill; Smiles in the Nargis' love-lorn eyes, and 'joys the dance of Daffodil; ...
— The Kasidah of Haji Abdu El-Yezdi • Richard F. Burton

... panting down-stairs to the corner drug-store for new tubes of tooth-paste and a presentable sponge, to remend all that was remendable, to press Father's flappy, shapeless little trousers with the family flat-iron, to worry over whether she should take the rose-pink or the daffodil-yellow wrapper—which had both faded to approximately the same shade of gray, but which were to her trusting mind still interestingly different. Each year she had to impress Mrs. Tubbs of West Skipsit with new metropolitan finery, and this year Father had no peace nor comfort ...
— The Innocents - A Story for Lovers • Sinclair Lewis

... daffodil I see, Hanging down his head towards me, Guess I may what I must be: First, I shall decline my head; Secondly, I shall ...
— The Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2 • Robert Herrick

... the cloud, Moses and Elias—the lustre and radiance and the dread voice were past, and everything was as it used to be. Christ stood alone there like some solitary figure relieved against a clear daffodil sky upon some extended plain, and there was nothing else to meet the eye but He. Christ is there, and in ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - St. Mark • Alexander Maclaren

... wrought, And overhead the strip of sky. So, going onward painfully, He met therein no evil thing, But came about the sun-setting Unto the opening of the pass, And thence beheld a vale of grass Bright with the yellow daffodil; And all the vale the sun did fill With his last glory. Midmost there Rose up a stronghold, built four-square, Upon a flowery grassy mound, That moat and high wall ran around. Thereby he saw a walled pleasance, With walks and sward fit for the ...
— The Earthly Paradise - A Poem • William Morris

... picture up in front of you and look me in the eyes and begin to talk. Tell me all the little things that most people leave out; what he said and she said on the way to the picnic, and how Betty looked in her daffodil dress, with the sun shining on her brown curls. Write as if you were making pictures for me, so that when I read I can see everything you ...
— The Little Colonel's Hero • Annie Fellows Johnston

... once. Then she leaned far out and tossed a daffodil she was carrying down on the heads in the garden, shaking her short, flower petal hair as she did it—she had cut it before starting on the adventure—in a ...
— The Little House in the Fairy Wood • Ethel Cook Eliot

... for another daffodil, and not finding one, contented herself with a bluebell, which she did not tear to pieces, but caressed with a tender hand. Kenelm bent his eyes down on her charming face with something in their gaze rarely seen there,—something of that unreasoning, inexpressible ...
— Kenelm Chillingly, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... that will, these pastimes still pursue, And on such pleasing fancies feed their fill; So I the fields and meadows green may view, And daily by fresh rivers walk at will, Among the daisies and the violets blue, Red hyacinth and yellow daffodil.* ...
— The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. • Washington Irving

... and left to stand on bare stalks. The South Gardens and the Court of Flowers were a golden glow of daffodils. Daffodils, too, were everywhere else, with rhododendron just breaking into bloom. The daffodil show lasted several weeks until, over night, it was replaced by acres of yellow tulips blooming above thick mats of pansies. This magic change was merely the result of McLaren's forethought. The daffodils had all been set at the right time to bloom when the Exposition ...
— The Jewel City • Ben Macomber

... brightness. The town, climbing the hill, assumed the proportions of a mighty citadel; the forest tree-tops were prismatic, emerald balls flung beneath the illumined Merveille; and the Cathedral was set in a daffodil frame; its aerial escalier de dentelle, like Jacob's ladder, led one easily heavenward. The circling birds, in the lace-work of the spiral finials, sang their night songs, as the glow in the sky ...
— In and Out of Three Normady Inns • Anna Bowman Dodd

... is like the silent influence of light, which gives colour to all nature; it is far more powerful than loudness or force, and far more fruitful. It pushes its way quietly and persistently, like the tiniest daffodil in spring, which raises the clod and thrusts it aside by ...
— Self Help • Samuel Smiles

... ago, and the other a little London boy with large eyes of velvet, who mid all the gloom of your great city saw and loved my face, as none had seen and loved it since she of Mitylene. I found the giant sitting by a country stream, holding a daffodil in his mighty hands and whistling to the birds. He took and wore me like a flower. I was to him as a nightingale that sang from his sleeve, for he loved so much besides. Yet me he loved best, as those who can read his secret poems understand. But my little London ...
— The Worshipper of the Image • Richard Le Gallienne

... a flower in the wood is waking, The daffodil is our doorside queen; She pushes upward the sward already, To spot with ...
— Poetical Works of William Cullen Bryant - Household Edition • William Cullen Bryant

... his feelings—deprived of his arrogant personality, his fame, his very identity, clothed in another man's dirty garments, wearing about his neck a clattering pedlar's outfit, upon his feet the clumsy boots of a peasant? Grimshaw—the exquisite futurist, the daffodil, apostle of the aesthetic! ...
— O. Henry Memorial Award Prize Stories of 1921 • Various

... fineness of tact, the Celtic nearness to nature and her secret; but the question is whether the strokes in the German's picture of nature[277] have ever the indefinable delicacy, charm, and perfection of the Celt's touch in the pieces I just now quoted, or of Shakespeare's touch in his daffodil,[278] Wordsworth's in his cuckoo,[279] Keats's in his Autumn, Obermann's in his mountain birch-tree, or his Easter-daisy among the Swiss farms.[280] To decide where the gift for natural magic originally lies, whether it ...
— Selections from the Prose Works of Matthew Arnold • Matthew Arnold

... little children pit-pat from their burrows on the hill; Hangs within the gloom its weary head the shining daffodil. In the valley underneath us through the fragrance flit along Over fields and over hedgerows little quivering drops of song. All adown the pale blue mantle of the mountains far away Stream the tresses of the twilight ...
— By Still Waters - Lyrical Poems Old and New • George William Russell

... go hand in hand,—sincerity, feeling, depth of thought, and simplicity of style. The union of these four qualities causes his great poems to continue to yield pleasure after an indefinite number of readings. In his garden of poetry, the daffodil blossoms all the year for the "inward eye," and the "wandering voice of the cuckoo" never ceases to awaken springtime in ...
— Halleck's New English Literature • Reuben P. Halleck

... greenish pallor. At last, the higher snows alone are livid with a last faint tinge of light, and all beneath is quite white. But the tide of glory turns. While the west grows momently more pale, the eastern heavens flush with afterglow, suffuse their spaces with pink and violet. Daffodil and tenderest emerald intermingle; and these colours spread until the west again has rose and primrose and sapphire wonderfully blent, and from the burning skies a light is cast upon the valley—a phantom light, less real, more like the hues of molten gems, than ...
— Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete - Series I, II, and III • John Symonds

... Employing both the Chaucerian model and a form similar to the practically forgotten Byronic stanza, Masefield wrote in rapid succession, The Everlasting Mercy (1911), The Widow in the Bye Street (1912), Dauber (1912), The Daffodil Fields (1913)—four astonishing rhymed narratives and four of the most remarkable poems of our generation. Expressive of every rugged phase of life, these poems, uniting old and new manners, responded to Synge's proclamation that "the strong ...
— Modern British Poetry • Various

... tomb, and were delighted to welcome her; and she left later to catch her train in the best of spirits. There was a man selling violets in the street. It was a fine day. She would remember to send Mr. Hilbery the first daffodil she saw. And, as she ran back into the hall to tell Katharine, she felt, she had always felt, that Shakespeare's command to leave his bones undisturbed applied only to odious curiosity-mongers—not to dear Sir John and herself. Leaving ...
— Night and Day • Virginia Woolf

... buttercup is like a golden cup, The marigold is like a golden frill, The daisy with a golden eye looks up, And golden spreads the flag beside the rill, And gay and golden nods the daffodil, The gorsey common swells a golden sea, The cowslip hangs a head of golden tips, And golden drips the honey which the bee Sucks from sweet hearts of flowers and ...
— Poems • Christina G. Rossetti

... Vibrating note and send'st it where, half hid In cedars, twilight sleeps—each azure lid Drooping a line of golden eyeball still.— Afar, yet near, I hear thy dewy voice Within the Garden of the Hours apoise On dusk's deep daffodil. ...
— Weeds by the Wall - Verses • Madison J. Cawein

... at the lift of the little bay of Rozel, and from the Nez du Guet scanned the sea for a sail and the sky for fair weather. When her eyes were not thus busy, they were searching the lee of the hillside round for yellow lilies, and the valley below for the campion, the daffodil, and the thousand pretty ferns growing in profusion there. Every night she looked out to see that her signal fire was lit upon the Nez du Guet, and she never went to bed without taking one last look over the sea, in the restless ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... listen to him as never a man could do; and a daffodil would dance with delight as never woman could;—or he thought so at least, which was the same thing. And he could keep the sheep all round him, charmed and still, high above on the hillside, with ...
— Wisdom, Wit, and Pathos of Ouida - Selected from the Works of Ouida • Ouida

... came into my room on the way up to bed. She—Lady Katherine—wanted to show Mary how beautifully they had had it done up; it used to be hers before she married. They looked all round at the dead-daffodil-colored cretonne and things, and at last I could see their eyes often straying to my night-gown, and dressing-gown, laid out on a chair ...
— Red Hair • Elinor Glyn

... The Daffodil most dainty is, To match with these in meetness; The Columbine compared to this, All much alike ...
— Language of Flowers • Kate Greenaway

... of living wreathe my face, My heart keeps time to freshet's race; Of balmy airs I drink my fill— Why, there's a yellow daffodil! Along the stream a soft green tinge Gives hint of feathery willow fringe; Methinks I heard a Robin's "Cheer"— ...
— Poems Teachers Ask For, Book Two • Various

... because these animals are destructive to the vine. Among the Egyptians they sacrificed a swine to him before their doors; and the dragon, and the pye on account of its chattering: the trees and plants used in his garlands were the fir, the oak, ivy, the fig, and vine; as also the daffodil, or narcissus. Bacchus had many temples erected to him by the Greeks and ...
— Roman Antiquities, and Ancient Mythology - For Classical Schools (2nd ed) • Charles K. Dillaway

... This is a large family, One gets confused sometimes with the names daffodil, jonquil and paper white narcissus. All these are of the family narcissus. The daffodils are the bulbs with large single or double cups. The jonquil has a cluster of small blossoms of from three to six single flowers. The ...
— The Library of Work and Play: Gardening and Farming. • Ellen Eddy Shaw

... grown into her beauty; her limbs were rounded, her body fulfilled, her skin sleeked and whitened; and if any mother's son had beheld her feet as they trod the meadow besprinkled with saffron and daffodil, ill had it gone with him were he gainsaid the kisses of them, though for the kissing had he ...
— The Water of the Wondrous Isles • William Morris

... the green-hung chair; but something keeps me still, And I fall in a dream that I walk'd with her on the side of a hill, Dotted, for was it not spring? with tufts of the daffodil. ...
— The Defence of Guenevere and Other Poems • William Morris

... idea is to carry out the fancy of having one kind of flower, massed according to the chosen design, serve for the decorations, at flower weddings; for example, rose weddings, lily weddings, daffodil weddings, etc. The design itself is according to the taste of the florist or the family, and is a subject changing so easily with the season or the fashion as to ...
— Social Life - or, The Manners and Customs of Polite Society • Maud C. Cooke

... the past four months have been in hiding and conspicuous by their absence, come forward again and spread triumphantly over the green as if in celebration of the dawn of the new spring; now that the violet and the daffodil, the marguerite and the hyacinth, the snowdrop and the bluebell, glorious in appearance, also announce, each in its own way, the advent of sunny spring, we are encouraged to hope that, "when peace again reigns over ...
— Native Life in South Africa, Before and Since • Solomon Tshekisho Plaatje

... maximus amplo calice flavo sive Nompareille. The great Nonesuch Daffodil, or incomparable Daffodil. Park. ...
— The Botanical Magazine, Vol. 4 - Or, Flower-Garden Displayed • William Curtis

... DAFFODIL. When Perseph'one, the daughter of Deme'ter, was a little maiden, she wandered about the meadows of Enna in Sicily, to gather white daffodils to wreathe into her hair, and being tired she fell asleep. Pluto, ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol 1 - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook • The Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D.

... a daffodil light over the evening sky in front of them, and it shone strangely on Jackanapes's hair and face. He turned with an odd look in his eyes that a vainer man than Tony Johnson might have taken for brotherly pride. Then he shook his mop, and laughed ...
— Children's Literature - A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-Training Classes • Charles Madison Curry

... sting of his archery, Hardest ashes and oaks Burn at the root below: Primrose, violet, daffodil, Start like blood where the shafts Light from ...
— Poems: New and Old • Henry Newbolt

... like the gorgeous gold of the lilies of the field, and Solomon in all his glory could not have beau arrayed like one of them. I hope he was not. I want to retain my respect for him. We dubbed these daffodil cavaliers "Butterflies," and the name stuck to them like a ...
— Andersonville, complete • John McElroy

... he mounts his lofty throne, visited only by the light of the stars, to whom are entrusted the guardianship of earth, before the sun sinks to rest in his rosy bed. High cliffs of rocks surround the romantic place, and in the small cavity of the rocky wall grows the daffodil clear and pure; and as the wind blows along the enchanting little mountain which surrounds the lonely spot, it nourishes the flowers with the dew-drops of heaven. Here is the seat of Elfonzo; darkness claims but little victory over this dominion, and in vain does she ...
— The $30,000 Bequest and Other Stories • Mark Twain

... on a bench by the flower-beds, gay in their spring charm of belated crocus and hyacinth and daffodil, with here and there a precocious tulip. Paul, sensitive to beauty, discoursed on flowers. Max Field had a studio in St. John's Wood opening out into a garden, which last summer was a dream of delight. He described it. When he came into his ...
— The Fortunate Youth • William J. Locke

... every year he became more beautiful to look at, so that all those who dwelt in the village were filled with wonder, for, while they were swarthy and black-haired, he was white and delicate as sawn ivory, and his curls were like the rings of the daffodil. His lips, also, were like the petals of a red flower, and his eyes were like violets by a river of pure water, and his body like the narcissus of a field where the mower ...
— A House of Pomegranates • Oscar Wilde

... sleep the thrush breaks through my dreams With sharp reminders of the coming day: After his call, one minute I remain Unwaked, and on the darkness which is Me There springs the image of a daffodil, Growing upon a grassy bank alone, And seeming with great joy his bell to fill With drops of golden dew, which on the lawn He shakes again, where ...
— Georgian Poetry 1918-19 • Various

... and thus we compass round Thy harmless and enchanted ground; And, as we sing thy dirge, we will The daffodil And other flowers lay upon The altar ...
— Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Complete • George Gilfillan

... wink, If Naiads swept them from the brink: Or where appointing lovers rove, The shelter of a shady grove; Or offer'd in some flowery vale, Were wafted by a gentle gale, There many a flower abstersive grew, Thy favourite flowers of yellow hue; The crocus and the daffodil, The cowslip soft, and sweet jonquil. But when at last usurping Jove Old Saturn from his empire drove, Then gluttony, with greasy paws Her napkin pinn'd up to her jaws, With watery chops, and wagging chin, Braced like a drum her oily skin; Wedged in a ...
— Poems (Volume II.) • Jonathan Swift

... Arabs borrowed nothing, but the Persians much, from Greek Mythology. Hence the eye of Narcissus, an idea hardly suggested by the look of the daffodil (or asphodel)-flower, is at times the glance of a spy and at times the die-away look of a mistress. Some scholars explain it by the form of the flower, the internal calyx resembling the iris, and the stalk being bent just below the petals suggesting drooping eyelids and languid eyes. Hence a poet ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... to stoop to smell The first bright daffodil of spring; 'Twas here she often tripped and fell And here she heard the robins sing. You'd call this but a common place, But you have never seen ...
— Just Folks • Edgar A. Guest

... daffodil and jonquil). Scilla, or squill. Snowdrop (Galanthus). Snowflake (Leucoium). Chionodoxa. Hardy alliums. Bulbocodium. Camassia. Lily-of-the-valley. Winter aconite (Eranthis hycmalis). Dog-tooth violets (Erythronium). Crown ...
— Manual of Gardening (Second Edition) • L. H. Bailey

... of California's perpetual youth and of her augmenting power. Perhaps close to the crescent flickers the evening star—that jewel on the brow of night which should be a symbol of San Francisco's eternal sparkle. And, perhaps floating over the City, a sheer high fog mutes the crescent's gold to a daffodil yellow; winds moist gauzes over the thrilling evening star. At the top of the high hill-streets, the lamps run in straight strings or pendant necklaces. Down their astonishing slopes slide cars like glass boxes filled with ...
— The Native Son • Inez Haynes Irwin

... The present species of Daffodil is the largest of the genus, and bears the most magnificent flowers, but, though it has long been known in this country, it is confined rather to the ...
— The Botanical Magazine v 2 - or Flower-Garden Displayed • William Curtis

... fresh lyrical impulse of his verse. The conceits of the metaphysical school appear in Herrick only in the form of an occasional pretty quaintness. He is the poet of English parish festivals and of English flowers, the primrose, the whitethorn, the daffodil. He sang the praises of the country life, love songs to "Julia," and hymns of thanksgiving for simple blessings. He has been called the English Catullus, but he strikes rather the Horatian note of Carpe diem, and regret at ...
— Brief History of English and American Literature • Henry A. Beers

... a daffodil show, and found myself in the very hall where the military bazaar was held last year. I saw the place where the Welch had their stall. What fun we had! How many of the regiment are left? Only one officer not killed or wounded. Lord Roberts, who opened the bazaar, is gone too. All ...
— My War Experiences in Two Continents • Sarah Macnaughtan

... blown up above the rim of the world. Westward, the sky was coloured with brilliant primrose; and on the edge of the distant moorlands lay a great bank of mist, rainbow-tinted with deep violet, and rose, and orange. For a space immediately on each side of the mist the primrose deepened into daffodil—a chaste yet intense splendour that seemed to stretch into infinite distances and overlap the sharply defined ridges of the dark horizon. The green of the upland pasture and the brown of the ploughland beyond were ...
— Creatures of the Night - A Book of Wild Life in Western Britain • Alfred W. Rees

... proportion of eighty adjectives to every sixty- five other words of all denominations. You may hunt for odd words, and thrust them into the wrong places, as where you say that a man's nose is "beetling," that the sun sank in "a cauldron of daffodil chaos," and the like. {2} You may use common words in an unwonted sense, keeping some private interpretation clearly before you. Thus you may speak, if you like to write partly in the tongue of Hellas, ...
— How to Fail in Literature • Andrew Lang

... Kingcup, daffodil and rose, Shall the fairy wreath compose; Beauty, sweetness, and delight, Crown our revels of the night: Lightly trip it o'er the green Where the Fairy ring is seen; So no step of earthly tread, Shall of end our ...
— A Fairy Tale in Two Acts Taken from Shakespeare (1763) • William Shakespeare

... little children sit by my side, I call them Lily and Daffodil; I gaze on them with a mother's pride, One is Edna, the ...
— Poems • Frances E. W. Harper

... round the borders, which are all full of the little glossy spikes of snowdrops pushing up, struggling through the crusted earth. The sad hero of Maud walked "in a ghastly glimmer," and found "the shining daffodil dead." I walk in the soft twilight, that is infinitely tender, soothing, and sweet, and find the daffodil taking on his new life; and there rises in my heart an uplifted yearning, not so much for the good days that are dead, but that I may somehow come to possess the peace that underlies ...
— The Silent Isle • Arthur Christopher Benson

... club-shaped column in the center of the apparent "flower." The beautiful white banner of the marsh calla, or the green and maroon striped pulpit from which Jack preaches, is no more the flower proper than the papery sheath below the daffodil is the daffodil. In the arum the white advertisement flaunted before flying insects is not even essential to the florets' existence, except as it helps them attract their pollen-carrying friends. Almost all waterside plants, it will be noticed, depend chiefly ...
— Wild Flowers, An Aid to Knowledge of Our Wild Flowers and - Their Insect Visitors - - Title: Nature's Garden • Neltje Blanchan

... tiny cowering thing of soft piteous gazes and miserable silences, like a sick puppy, too sick to whimper; now she was almost soulless in her beauty and well-being, and as little a matter for pity as a daffodil in sunshine. She was completely, absorbedly young and greedy and happy. The fear that life was really horrid had obscured her bright colours like a cobweb, but now she was radiant again; it was as if a wind had blown through her ...
— The Judge • Rebecca West

... his breast, Ere the daffodil is drest, Ere the iris' lovely head Waves above her perfumed bed Comes the crocus—and the Spring Follows ...
— Fires of Driftwood • Isabel Ecclestone Mackay

... where Mr. Hassal sat was a box containing a beautiful gown, all daffodil silk and delicate wavelets of chiffon. And there were daffodil shoes and stockings, a plume fan in a hat-box on her knee, and a lovely trained white underskirt with billowy frills of torchon, the very sight of which made Meg wild to ...
— Seven Little Australians • Ethel Sybil Turner

... This season's Daffodil, She never hears, What change, what chance, what chill, Cut down last year's: But with bold countenance, And knowledge small, Esteems her seven ...
— Songs from Books • Rudyard Kipling

... regard her. Presently it swept on out of hearing, and by-and-bye they reached the summit of the hill, and looked forth on the dark pine plantations on the opposite undulation, standing out in black relief against a sky golden with a pale, pure, pearly November sunset, a 'daffodil sky' flecked with tiny fleeces of soft bright-yellow light, reminding Albinia of Fouque's beautiful dream of Aslauga's golden hair showing the gates of Heaven to her devoted knight. She looked for her companion's sympathy in her admiration, but the woods seemed to oppress him, and his panting ...
— The Young Step-Mother • Charlotte M. Yonge

... in all the beautiful greenness of her tent, with her yellow head coming out from above the greens and browns of the cretonne bed-cover for all the world like a daffodil pushing its way up through the ...
— A Summer in a Canyon: A California Story • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... peered at Rachel, and she sat down faint and dizzy, holding them in her nerveless hands. If one daffodil knows anything, all daffodils know it to ...
— Red Pottage • Mary Cholmondeley

... tired. Now things were beginning and everyone was rather inclined to believe that this year would be better than last. "Look at the shop windows," said Betty, "full of whites and pinks and yellows and blues—the colours of hyacinth and daffodil beds. It seems as if they insist that there never has been a winter and never will be one. They insist that there never was and never ...
— The Shuttle • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... years, I had fallen in and out of love assiduously. Since the Anabasis of lad's love traverses a monotonous country, where one hill is largely like another, and one meadow a duplicate of the next to the last daffodil, I may with profit dwell upon the green-sickness lightly. It suffices that in the course of these four years I challenged superstition by adoring thirteen girls, and, worse than that, wrote ...
— The Cords of Vanity • James Branch Cabell et al

... the village streets, up where the sunset died in daffodil above the upland, saw the little cot of logs, and out before it, among blood-red poppies, the woman of whom he had heard. Her gown of white gleamed in that eerie radiance, glorified, her sad great eyes bent on him in magnetic scrutiny. A peace and plenitude ...
— A Mountain Woman and Others • (AKA Elia Wilkinson) Elia W. Peattie

... into the courtyard, which already was gay with the flowers of early spring. The window-boxes, too, and vases within open casements splashed patches of colour upon the old-world canvas, the yellow and purple of crocus and daffodil, modest star-blue of forget-me-nots and the varied tints of sweet hyacinth. Flamby's tiny house, which Mrs. Chumley called "the squirrel's nest," was fragrant with roses, for Flamby's taste in flowers was extravagant, ...
— The Orchard of Tears • Sax Rohmer

... out a variety of early spring plants, every one of them came up a Hyacinth! One after another was sent to pot; but, hydra-headed, still they come! By the way, it is said that two newly noted people in the church are Frere JONQUIL and Soeur DAFFODIL; another is a negro priest, black as two ravens, and he is called ...
— Punchinello, Vol.1, No. 4, April 23, 1870 • Various

... into hide-and-seek with all the gusto and abandonment of the true artist, and as she flitted away and reappeared, flushed and laughing divinely, the pale witch-maiden seemed to fall away from her, and she moved rather as that other girl I had read about, snatched from fields of daffodil to reign in shadow below, yet permitted once again to visit earth, and light, and ...
— The Golden Age • Kenneth Grahame

... ewes cowered with their early lambs under shivering thorns, and old men complained of the blast that roused the slumbering rheum and played havoc with their feeble frames. Scanty snow showers fell late under 'the roaring moon of daffodil,' whitening the moorlands and lying glistening in the morning light, to be gathered up by the rays of the sun that day by day climbed higher in the cold blue of the sky of spring. Young blades of green lay scattered like emerald shafts amid the tawny wastes ...
— Lancashire Idylls (1898) • Marshall Mather

... eyebrows being only a shade or two darker than her long, straight rather dull-looking, yellow hair. She always wore her hair straight down her back; she was very willowy and pliant in figure, and had something of the grace and coloring of a daffodil. ...
— Polly - A New-Fashioned Girl • L. T. Meade

... looked with pleasure at the six virgins fluttering in their green gowns, and peeping bright-eyed and rosy-cheeked under their green bonnets. Beyond them he saw the forbidden orchard, with cuckoo-flower and primrose, daffodil and celandine, silver windflower and sweet violets blue and white, spangling the gay grass. The twisted apple-trees were ...
— Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard • Eleanor Farjeon

... Primrose, Sister Anne! Pull as many as you can. 10 —Here are Daisies, take your fill; Pansies, and the Cuckow-flower: Of the lofty Daffodil Make your bed, and make your bower; Fill your lap, and fill your ...
— Poems In Two Volumes, Vol. 2 • William Wordsworth

... is virtue still, And virtue shows a richer bloom, As violet, or daffodil, When growing 'mid the ...
— Canada and Other Poems • T.F. Young

... in the early spring, 5 A daffodil blooms in the grass, Golden and gracious and glad, ...
— Sappho: One Hundred Lyrics • Bliss Carman

... they lived would the children forget the scene before them! The budding trees, the singing of the birds, and the sweet scents that came to them were only part of the great surprise that awaited them. Golden sheets of daffodil and white narcissus bordered the dark evergreen shrubberies; edging the old lawn were clumps of violets and primroses. Hyacinths, tulips, and other bulbs were making the flower beds a mass of bright colour, and ...
— Bulbs and Blossoms • Amy Le Feuvre

... solemn mountains guard Riouperoux, - Small untidy village where the river drives a mill: Frail as wood anemones, white and frail were you, And drooping a little, like the slender daffodil. ...
— Forty-Two Poems • James Elroy Flecker

... Cynthia's wedding and festivity? Not Hesperus: lo! upon his silver wings 570 He leans away for highest heaven and sings, Snapping his lucid fingers merrily!— Ah, Zephyrus! art here, and Flora too! Ye tender bibbers of the rain and dew, Young playmates of the rose and daffodil, Be careful, ere ye enter in, to fill Your baskets high With fennel green, and balm, and golden pines, Savory, latter-mint, and columbines, Cool parsley, basil sweet, and sunny thyme; 580 Yea, every flower and leaf of every ...
— Endymion - A Poetic Romance • John Keats

... need scarcely recommend what may be most desirable. The crocus, and snowdrop are among (if not quite) the earliest in bloom; and to these follow the hyacinth, and daffodil, the jonquil, and many-varied family of Narcissus, the low-headed hearts-ease, or pansy; with them, too, comes the flowering-almond, the lilac, and another or two flowering shrubs. Then follow the tulips, in all their gorgeous ...
— Rural Architecture - Being a Complete Description of Farm Houses, Cottages, and Out Buildings • Lewis Falley Allen

... city has rolled Across that bower of old, And blotted out the beds of the rose and the daffodil; But the little playmate sleeps, And the shrine of love still keeps A record of happy days, on the edge ...
— The Poems of Henry Van Dyke • Henry Van Dyke

... Duncan's eyes scarcely for a moment rested upon them. He had turned his chair a little, and he sat directly facing the chateau. The golden cornfields, the stained-glass windows of the grey church rising like a cathedral, as it were, in the midst of the daffodil-starred meadows, caught now with the flood of the dying sunlight mingled so harmoniously with their own time-mellowed richness, the increasing perfume of the flowers by which they were surrounded,—none of these things seemed for one moment to distract ...
— The Avenger • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... Daffodil, With Violet blue; Since you have seen the beauty of my saint, And eke her view; Did not her sight (fair sight!) you lonely fill, With sweet delight Of goddess' grace and angels' sacred ...
— Book of English Verse • Bulchevy

... cloud, nothing more, Slow drifting by my door, Or gardened lilies swaying in the wind; Then suddenly each separate face I knew, The tender lovers drifting two and two, Old, peaceful folk long since passed out of mind, And little children—one whose hand held still An earth-grown daffodil. ...
— The Haunted Hour - An Anthology • Various

... saw again as then I saw. As then I saw, I saw again The harvest-waggon in the lane, With high-hung tokens of its pride Left in the elms on either side; The daisies coming out at dawn In constellations on the lawn; The glory of the daffodil; The three black windmills on the hill, Whose magic arms, flung wildly by, Sent magic shadows o'er the rye. Within the leafy coppice, lo, More wealth than miser's dreams could show, The blackbird's warm and woolly brood, Five golden beaks agape for food; The Gipsies, ...
— The Victories of Love - and Other Poems • Coventry Patmore

... the happy rill, The miller's beautiful child was there That wore the tresses of sun-lit hair And smile of witchery; And the twittering swallows awhirl in the air, Told in their ecstacy That Rachel, the Golden Daffodil, Was blooming again ...
— The Loom of Life • Cotton Noe

... thirty tons are taken in one boatload. The more severe the weather on the mainland, the better is the demand. The bulbs are set in narrow fields, to secure their shelter from the winds by thick hedges. As many as two hundred kinds of narcissus, daffodil, and lily are now cultivated. "The beds are renewed every third year. This is necessary to retain the vigour of the plant, as if allowed to remain too long without lifting, the bulbs crowd each other and send up barren ...
— The Cornwall Coast • Arthur L. Salmon

... "The Daffodil" is here out of compliment to a splendid school and a splendid teacher at Poughkeepsie. I found the pupils learning the poem, the teacher having placed a bunch of daffodils in a vase before them. It was ...
— Poems Every Child Should Know - The What-Every-Child-Should-Know-Library • Various

... darling, And I your love were death, We'd shine and snow together Ere March made sweet the weather With daffodil and starling And hours of fruitful breath; If you were life, my darling, And I your ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 2 (of 4) • Various

... vapor lightly spreads Among the trees, and round the beds Where daffodil and jonquil sleep, Only ...
— The Red Flower - Poems Written in War Time • Henry Van Dyke

... You come upon the first one as you are shown up the staircase to the drawing-room. It is outside the staircase window. This is the daffodil garden—3 ft. 8 ins. by 9 ins. The vulgar speak of it as a window-box; that is how one knows that they are vulgar. The maid has her instructions; we are not at ...
— If I May • A. A. Milne

... looked the breath of drenched violets greeted his nostrels. He noticed that the lilacs were coming into blossom. The fruit trees already stood like brides veiled in their fresh bloom. The tulip and hyacinth and daffodil beds were gay with color. How their newly washed faces shone in the sunshine, just ...
— The Dreamer - A Romantic Rendering of the Life-Story of Edgar Allan Poe • Mary Newton Stanard

... are there roses still In Ablain St. Nazaire, And crosses girt with daffodil In that old garden there. I wonder if the long grass waves With wild-flowers just the same, Where Germans made their soldiers' ...
— Mr. Punch's History of the Great War • Punch

... flower, words of the green leaf; they speak through that slender tone. Sweetness of dew and rifts of sunshine, the dark hawthorn touched with breadths of open bud, the odour of the air, the colour of the daffodil—all that is delicious and beloved of spring-time are expressed in his song. Genius is nature, and his lay, like the sap in the bough from which he sings, rises without thought. Nor is it necessary that it should be a song; a few short notes ...
— Field and Hedgerow • Richard Jefferies

... acme. The flowers, even while the scythes were gleaming that were shortly to unfound their several pretensions in that leveller of all distinctions, Hay, made great muster, as if it had been for some horticultural show-day. Amongst then we particularly noticed the purple orchis and the honied daffodil, fly-swarming and bee-beset, and the stately thistle, burnished with many a panting goldfinch, resting momentarily from his butterfly hunt, and clinging timidly to the slender stem that bent under him. Close to ...
— Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 365, March, 1846 • Various

... he won big, he lost big; but he won always more than he lost, and what he paid out at one game with one hand, he drew back with his other hand at another game. His winnings from the Comstock he sank into the various holes of the bottomless Daffodil Group in Eldorado County. The wreckage from the Benicia Line he turned into the Napa Consolidated, which was a quicksilver venture, and it earned him five thousand per cent. What he lost in the collapse of the Stockton boom was more than balanced by the realty appreciation of his key- holdings ...
— The Little Lady of the Big House • Jack London

... and meads, the daffodil Its yellow richness spreads, And by the fountain-heads Of rivers, cowslips cluster ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... bateto. Daffodil narciso. Dagger ponardo. Dahlia dalio. Daily cxiutage, cxiutaga. Dainty frandajxo. Dainty frandema. Dairy laktovendejo. Daisy lekanto. Dale valeto. Dally malfrui. Dam bestopatrino. Dam akvosxtopilo, digo. Damage difekti. Damage difektajxo. Damask damasko. Dame ...
— English-Esperanto Dictionary • John Charles O'Connor and Charles Frederic Hayes

... that hath fed upon nought But the dainty dames pied, And the violet sweet, and the daffodil That grow fair ...
— The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood • Howard Pyle

... both they and I loved. Miss Amelia, with her beautiful complexion, rounded form and regal mien, suggested to my childish mind more, much more, than the mere semblance of a rose, whilst Miss Deborah, with her sprightly grace and golden hair, was only masquerading as a woman—she was in reality a daffodil. ...
— Scottish Ghost Stories • Elliott O'Donnell

... this month if you wish the pick of the new crop. There are two fall blooming bulbs that would add to our September and October gardens. One is the Sternbergia, or autumn daffodil, and the other ...
— Trees, Fruits and Flowers of Minnesota, 1916 • Various

... Dandelion! Fast falls the snow, Bending the daffodil's Haughty head low. Under that fleecy tent, Careless of cold, Blithe little Dandelion Counteth ...
— Dotty Dimple Out West • Sophie May

... Venus-like on the rolling sea, nor in any of blind Homer's as blind caves: but in the Fortunate Islands, where all things grew without plowing or sowing; where neither labor, nor old age, nor disease was ever heard of; and in whose fields neither daffodil, mallows, onions, beans, and such contemptible things would ever grow, but, on the contrary, rue, angelica, bugloss, marjoram, trefoils, roses, violets, lilies, and all the gardens of Adonis invite both your sight and your smelling. And being thus born, I did not begin the world, as other children ...
— The Praise of Folly • Desiderius Erasmus

... Her slim white neck and went To Heaven a virgin still, The nodding daffodil, That bends but ...
— Helen Redeemed and Other Poems • Maurice Hewlett

... love—from me. But come, let us forget the Lady Barbara while we may—after we have drunk a measure of wine to her safe conduct from Camberwell to The Jolly Grig. From here to London her safety will depend on our swords. To the Lady Barbara, I say, to her daffodil hair, to her violet eyes, to her poppy lips, to her lily cheeks! Is that lover-like enough? Eh, Clarence? And I'll add, to the icicle that incloses her heart. May her peace be unbroken on the road from ...
— Ainslee's, Vol. 15, No. 6, July 1905 • Various

... Mullins did. You could see it. The first day he came down to the lunch, all dressed up with the American Beauty and the white waistcoat. The second day he only wore a pink carnation and a grey waistcoat. The third day he had on a dead daffodil and a cardigan undervest, and on the last day, when the high school teachers should have been there, he only wore his office suit and he hadn't even shaved. ...
— Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town • Stephen Leacock

... down the path. Her soul was listless; even the morning breeze Fluttering the trees and strewing a light swath Of fallen petals on the grass, could please Her not at all. She brushed a hair aside With a swift move, and a half-angry frown. She stopped to pull a daffodil or two, And held them to her gown To test the colours; put them at her side, Then at her breast, then loosened them and tried Some new arrangement, but ...
— Men, Women and Ghosts • Amy Lowell

... sweet Bard of Avon that so expressed himself—'Sufficient for the day is the evil thereof.' That is why I have selected Bulwer's great romantic and poetic masterpiece—'The Lady of Lyons.' Besides, ladies, bear in mind it will afford Miss Daisy Daffodil a magnificent opportunity to appear as Pauline, a character, ladies, which has claimed the histrionic talents of many of the bright luminaries of the stage from the days of the glorious Peg Woffington to ...
— A Pirate of Parts • Richard Neville

... with song-troubled breast— Thou welcome and bewildering guest! Blithe troubadour, whose laughing note Brings Spring into a poet's throat,— Flute, feathered joy! thy painted bill Foretells the daffodil. ...
— A Cluster of Grapes - A Book of Twentieth Century Poetry • Various

... that led almost precipitously down to the stream, where the ground rose equally rapidly on the other side. Moss, ivy, rhododendrons, primroses, anemones, and the promise of ferns were there, and the adjacent beds had their full share of hepaticas and all the early daffodil kinds. Behind and on the southern side, lay the kitchen garden, also a succession of steps, and beyond as the ravine widened were small meadows, each with a big stone in the midst. The gulley, (or goyle) narrowed as it rose, and there was a disused limestone ...
— Modern Broods • Charlotte Mary Yonge

... you know," continued Maryllia; "Nobody can hold her but me! She's a perfectly magnificent hunter. I have another one who is gentleness itself, called Daffodil. My groom rides her. He could never ride Cleo." She paused, patting the mare's neck again,—then gathering up the reins in her small, loosely- gloved hand, she said: "Well, good-morning, Mr. Walden! It was ...
— God's Good Man • Marie Corelli

... broke, and the early birds began to chirp in the ivy and to prune their plumage and flutter among the leaves; and down the street tramped the feet of the toilers on their way to forge and dock. Over the harbor came the daffodil light from the sun-tipped eastern hills, and it painted the waves that lapped the sleek sides of a yacht lying at anchor under the hill. A yacht that Paul had watched many a day and dreamed of many a night; for he often longed with a great longing to slip ...
— In the Footprints of the Padres • Charles Warren Stoddard

... draw from an object without guidance, or with quite ineffective guidance, than to draw from a flat copy. In some schools the formula or "tip" is beginning to take the place of the flat copy. There is a formula for the tulip, a formula for the snowdrop, a formula for the daffodil, and so on; and the children draw from these formulae while the actual flowers are before them and they are making believe to reproduce them. In other schools an object is placed before the class, ...
— What Is and What Might Be - A Study of Education in General and Elementary Education in Particular • Edmond Holmes

... herself by degrees, as the great source of light rises from his couch, curtained with rose and daffodil-coloured drapery. As these gorgeous curtains spread east and west, and he takes his morning bath in the clouds and vapours, rises up the proud monarch of the farm-yard, as if in bold rivalry, outspreads his fine ...
— Gladys, the Reaper • Anne Beale

... is simply ravie de joie at the rage for arms, for her Daffodil, who's been a great worry to her (she's the only clever one, you know, all the others being pretty), has the best arms of the whole bunch. She's taken Madame Fallalerie's course, "The Fascination of the Arms," and is made to flourish hers about from morn to night, poor child, till she sometimes ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 156, May 28, 1919. • Various



Words linked to "Daffodil" :   paper white, narcissus, jonquil, daffodil garlic, Narcissus pseudonarcissus, Narcissus papyraceus



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